1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Nortons Equivalent Circuit to find I

  1. Feb 17, 2010 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    XNOoY.png

    Use Norton's Equivalent Circuit to find current I through 15ohm resistor.

    2. Relevant equations

    norton's theorem states that any two terminal network that includes many sources and resistors can be converted into an equivalent two terminal network with one current source and a parallel resistor

    3. The attempt at a solution

    i have tried to simplify the circuit using source conversion but have failed. do i need to regard the 10 ohm and 5 ohm as in series and 12 ohm and 16 ohm in series? then use the resulting resistances in parallel to the 200v source?

    any help on how to start would be great. thank you!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 17, 2010 #2
    The answer to your question is yes, think of it like this;

    scan0002-1.jpg

    Now remember, current will only flow in the virtical wire depending on the potential difference between the two points where it hits the horizontal ones, work out what the potential will be at the two points where the dividing wire touches the two parralel wires and then use I = V/R
     
    Last edited: Feb 17, 2010
  4. Feb 17, 2010 #3

    vela

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Education Advisor

    Remove the 15-ohm resistor from the circuit and label the two nodes to which it connected A and B. What you want to do is replace the remaining circuit by its Norton equivalent. To find INorton, you want to short A and B and calculate how much current flows through the wire connecting A to B. To find RNorton, replace the voltage source with a wire and calculate the equivalent resistance seen between A and B.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Nortons Equivalent Circuit to find I
Loading...