Not Homework, But can somone explain

In summary, the conversation is about two different iron ions, Fe2+ and Fe3+, and which one would move faster when accelerated by the same potential and sent through a uniform magnetic field in a mass spectrometer. The equation v = Sqrt(2qV/m) is mentioned, where q represents the magnitude of charge and V is the potential difference. It is suggested that Fe3+ would move faster due to its larger magnitude of charge, but the difference in mass is questioned. It is explained that the difference between the two ions is the number of valence electrons, not protons or neutrons. Therefore, the only difference in mass is the mass of a single electron, making the different charges the dominant factor in the ions
  • #1
quickslant
90
0
This is a support question in my package. It says 2 different iron ions,
Fe2+ and Fe3+ are accelerate by the same potential and then sent through the uniform magnetic field of a mass spectrometer

which ion moves faster? and why?

Equation v= Sqrt(2qV/m) where q is magnitude of charge of the ion and V is the potential difference aross the plate

i would think that Fe 3+ would move faster because it has a larger magnitude of charge than Fe 2+

but i could be totally wrong, can someone explain to me?
 
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  • #2
Is there any difference in mass?
 
  • #3
im not sure, i thought that they weighed the same ?? is one heavier than the other? i thought it would depend more so on the magnitude of charge than the weight.. but please help me understand this
 
  • #4
quickslant said:
im not sure, i thought that they weighed the same ??
Let's make sure.

What's the difference between Fe2+ and Fe3+ ? Do you know what the 2+ or 3+ represents (alternatively, how do you make a positive ion starting from a neutral atom)?
 
  • #5
yes. valence it means that one has 2 valence electrons and the other has 3 valence electrons, considering this would that mean that Fe3+ has one extra proton making it weigh more?
 
  • #6
quickslant said:
yes. valence it means that one has 2 valence electrons and the other has 3 valence electrons, considering this would that mean that Fe3+ has one extra proton making it weigh more?
Close, but you're making a small mistake. When you make an ion out of a neutral atom, you do not change anything in the nucleus (protons, neutrons). All you do is add or remove electrons.

Starting from a neutral Fe-atom, removing two electrons gives you Fe2+. Pluck out another electron, and you have Fe3+.

So the only difference in mass between those two ions, is the mass of a single electron! And, as you know, the electron's mass is tiny compared to the mass of the atom, so the dominant effect, as you correctly guessed earlier, is the different charges on the two ions.

So your first guess was, in fact, correct! But it's important that the method applied also be correct.
 
Last edited:
  • #7
thank you very much.. all the help was appreciated
 

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