Nuclear Fusion Explained Simply - 3 Day Guide

In summary: The deuterium nucleus is composed of one proton and one neutron. The neutron is a product of the weak interaction, and is a very stable nucleus. When two protons collide, one of the protons is converted to a neutron, and a neutron-proton reaction results in the release of energy."
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Hello,I've been wondering if any of you can suggest an internet source that explains nuclear fusion in a not too complicated way.My problem was,that I need it to make a presentation in physics class,but the simple ways it explains it,it says things like ''protons and neutrons are clumped together and the protons in the center of the nucleus...etc'' and I'm aware,that it's not very correct to explain particles as billiard balls arranged in clumps,but when I look into more scientific sources,the material becomes way too complicated with theories and formulas that I can't learn in the time frame that I have to complete this assignment(3 days).So do you know any source that has information fitting the criteria :?
 
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http://www.lightandmatter.com/html_books/4em/ch02/ch02.html [Broken]
 
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Wikipedia has some nice general info on the subject as well. Just take the basics and use them and you can ignore the math and such.
 
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bcrowell said:
http://www.lightandmatter.com/html_books/4em/ch02/ch02.html [Broken]

Very nice. Thanks for that!
 
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Hivoyer said:
Hello,I've been wondering if any of you can suggest an internet source that explains nuclear fusion in a not too complicated way.My problem was,that I need it to make a presentation in physics class,but the simple ways it explains it,it says things like ''protons and neutrons are clumped together and the protons in the center of the nucleus...etc'' and I'm aware,that it's not very correct to explain particles as billiard balls arranged in clumps,but when I look into more scientific sources,the material becomes way too complicated with theories and formulas that I can't learn in the time frame that I have to complete this assignment(3 days).So do you know any source that has information fitting the criteria :?
Is one interested in fusion in stars, or terresterial fusion reactions for energy production.

See - http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/nucene/nucbin.html
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/nucene/fuscon.html
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/astro/procyc.html

"In the proton-proton fusion process, deuterium is produced by the weak interaction in a quark transformation which converts one of the protons to a neutron."

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/particles/qrkdec.html
 

1. What is nuclear fusion?

Nuclear fusion is a process in which two or more atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier nucleus, releasing a large amount of energy in the process. It is the same process that powers the sun and other stars.

2. How does nuclear fusion work?

Nuclear fusion occurs when two atomic nuclei come close enough together for the strong force to overcome their electric repulsion. This results in the nuclei fusing together and releasing energy in the form of light and heat.

3. What are the advantages of nuclear fusion?

Nuclear fusion has several advantages over other energy sources. It produces no greenhouse gases, has an almost limitless fuel supply, and does not produce long-lived radioactive waste.

4. What are the challenges of achieving nuclear fusion?

One of the main challenges of achieving nuclear fusion is the extremely high temperatures and pressures required to initiate and sustain the fusion reaction. Additionally, controlling and containing the extremely hot plasma is also a significant challenge.

5. How close are we to achieving practical nuclear fusion?

While significant progress has been made in the field of nuclear fusion, practical fusion power is still a long way off. Scientists and engineers are continuously working to overcome the technical challenges and make fusion a viable energy source in the future.

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