Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of equations to calculate the field necessary to produce nuclear magnetic resonance at 60 MHz. The equations involve the gyromagnetic ratio and the mass of the proton. It is important to use SI units in order to obtain the correct solution.
  • #1
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Homework Statement



Nuclear magnetic resonance in water is due to the protons of hydrogen. Find the field necessary to produce NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) at 60 MHz.

Homework Equations



These are the equations I think I'm supposed to use:

omega (subscript zero) = gamma * B (subscript zero) (omega is frequency, B is magnetic field)

B sub 0 = (omega sub zero) / (ge/2m)

The Attempt at a Solution



I know that gamma = ge/2m, and g is the gyromagnetic ratio, but do I use g for electrons (g = 2?) and e as the electron charge? The problem states that the nuclear magnetic resonance in water is due to protons, so do I use the g for water? e can only be one thing, right (1.6 * 10^-19) and for m, do I use the mass of an electron or a proton? The equations are not complicated for this problem, but I'm confused about what constants to use (protons or electrons?). Please help!

Thanks!
 
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  • #3
ok, so I should use the g-factor for a proton that you gave. And I should use e = 1.6*10^-19, and I should use m = 9.11 X 10^-31 kg? Using that the magnetic field is equal to the frequency divided by ge/2m, I should be able to solve for the field that would produce nuclear magnetic resonance at MHz?
 
  • #4
no should use the mass of the proton.

Use Si units all the way, then you should get the answer in Hz
 
  • #5
steph_mil said:
ok, so I should use the g-factor for a proton that you gave. And I should use e = 1.6*10^-19, and I should use m = 9.11 X 10^-31 kg? Using that the magnetic field is equal to the frequency divided by ge/2m, I should be able to solve for the field that would produce nuclear magnetic resonance at MHz?


you got the correct value?
 

1. What is Nuclear Magnetic Resonance?

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a technique used to study the structure and properties of molecules by analyzing the interaction between their nuclei and external magnetic fields.

2. How does NMR work?

NMR works by placing a sample in a strong magnetic field, which causes the nuclei of certain atoms to align with the field. Radio frequency pulses are then applied to the sample, causing the nuclei to absorb energy and change their alignment. The energy emitted when the nuclei return to their original alignment is measured and used to create a spectrum, providing information about the structure and chemical environment of the sample.

3. What are the applications of NMR?

NMR is widely used in chemistry, biochemistry, and medicine for various applications such as determining molecular structures, studying protein interactions, and diagnosing diseases. It is also used in the development of new drugs and materials.

4. Is NMR safe?

Yes, NMR is considered to be a safe technique as it does not involve exposure to ionizing radiation. However, strong magnetic fields can have potential risks for individuals with certain medical implants or devices, so proper safety precautions must be taken.

5. What are the advantages of NMR over other analytical techniques?

NMR has several advantages over other analytical techniques, including its ability to provide information about the three-dimensional structure of molecules, its non-destructive nature, and its sensitivity to subtle changes in chemical environment. It is also a relatively quick and cost-effective method compared to techniques such as X-ray crystallography.

Suggested for: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

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