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Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

  1. May 4, 2008 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Nuclear magnetic resonance in water is due to the protons of hydrogen. Find the field necessary to produce NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) at 60 MHz.

    2. Relevant equations

    These are the equations I think I'm supposed to use:

    omega (subscript zero) = gamma * B (subscript zero) (omega is frequency, B is magnetic field)

    B sub 0 = (omega sub zero) / (ge/2m)

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I know that gamma = ge/2m, and g is the gyromagnetic ratio, but do I use g for electrons (g = 2???) and e as the electron charge? The problem states that the nuclear magnetic resonance in water is due to protons, so do I use the g for water? e can only be one thing, right (1.6 * 10^-19) and for m, do I use the mass of an electron or a proton??? The equations are not complicated for this problem, but I'm confused about what constants to use (protons or electrons???). Please help!

    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 4, 2008 #2

    malawi_glenn

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  4. May 4, 2008 #3
    ok, so I should use the g-factor for a proton that you gave. And I should use e = 1.6*10^-19, and I should use m = 9.11 X 10^-31 kg? Using that the magnetic field is equal to the frequency divided by ge/2m, I should be able to solve for the field that would produce nuclear magnetic resonance at MHz???
     
  5. May 4, 2008 #4

    malawi_glenn

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    no should use the mass of the proton.

    Use Si units all the way, then you should get the answer in Hz
     
  6. May 4, 2008 #5

    malawi_glenn

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    you got the correct value?
     
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