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Olympic athlete dies after luge crash

  1. Feb 12, 2010 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    Very sad. There is talk that there is a problem with the track.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 12, 2010 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    A related story from Feb 3rd

    http://www.cbc.ca/olympics/story/2010/02/12/spo-perilympics.html [Broken]

    One athlete was just saying that some people have hit 97 mph on this luge track. It is the fastest track in the world.

    egad, I just saw the video. He flies off the track and right into a cement or steel post. Yeah, I'd say there is a problem with the track.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  4. Feb 12, 2010 #3
    It is the most dangerous too.

    Blackcomb needs to get their heads out of their arse and create a safe track. There has been accidents before, and they have been told to fix the problems and they havent.

    This p***es me off. There is no reason anyone should have died on that track. Injuries from lack of concentration I can expect, but no one should ever leave the track.
     
  5. Feb 12, 2010 #4

    Evo

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    Do we really need ever faster, deadlier sports in order to entertain ourselves?

    I like the ice skating because it takes talent, not just athletic prowess. That's really all I watch.
     
  6. Feb 12, 2010 #5

    turbo

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    Very sad. He was a very young man to have gotten to this level of luge, and this track is VERY fast. Looking at the video on the evening news, he went very high in that last sweeping curve, and then slammed down into the opposite side of the track and rocketed off course into unpadded obstructions. At those high speeds, it might be possible for sliders to encounter aerodynamic unloading that they have never experienced before, and lose control. Those sleds are very light and the sliders are more like human bullets.

    Good luck to Maine's Julia Clukey. She has been plagued with injuries this season. Stay on course.
     
  7. Feb 12, 2010 #6

    Dembadon

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    Our favorite is the team figure skating. The sheer amount of balance and coordination it takes to pull off some of the things they do will forever leave me astonished. Just the choreography alone is quite an accomplishment, but to then do it on ice!?!? :surprised:

    We also like to see the gymnastics / tumbling events.
     
  8. Feb 12, 2010 #7

    Borg

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    It was indeed very sad to see. :frown: I saw the video as well - he didn't stand a chance. I can't believe that they didn't have railings there - even a sheet of plexiglass between the beams would have probably saved his life.
     
  9. Feb 12, 2010 #8

    Astronuc

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    At the point that a human body is flying along at 90+ mph on nothing but a board, the safety precautions are paramount. It certainly takes great skill as well as speed to get the fastest average speed, or shortest course time, but there's something very wrong with the system where some guy flies off the track at ~90 mph. The body isn't designed to take high speed impacts.

    RIP Nodar Kumaritashvili.

    My condolences to his family and friends.
     
  10. Feb 12, 2010 #9

    turbo

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    You're right. Any kind of slick barrier to herd a slider back down onto the track would have been far preferable to nothing. I hope the lack of such barriers is not driven by the desire to have open video-cam access to the track without the sports-photographers having to shoot through plexi.
     
  11. Feb 12, 2010 #10
    How many people die annually from this sport?
     
  12. Feb 12, 2010 #11

    turbo

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    There are surprisingly few injuries in this sport considering the speeds involved, and very few fatalities.
     
  13. Feb 12, 2010 #12
    I thought so. I didn't go through all the thread but was just replying to ..

     
  14. Feb 12, 2010 #13

    Evo

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    The athletes themselves are speaking out against it.

    http://sports.yahoo.com/olympics/news?slug=dw-lugedeath021210&prov=yhoo&type=lgns
     
  15. Feb 12, 2010 #14
  16. Feb 12, 2010 #15

    Evo

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    Like driving? That's ridiculous. Have you seen the precautions and gear that sports car drivers have to prevent injury?
     
  17. Feb 12, 2010 #16
    Exactly. When you look at the histories of auto and motorcycle racing, as speeds increased, and injuries/fatalities began increasing, safety precautions were improved. Barriers have been designed to reduce impact force; vehicle/engine design restrictions to limit speed; driver/rider personal safety equipment improvements.
     
  18. Feb 12, 2010 #17
    I would agree with both of you if you can prove that number of injuries/fatalities in this sport are concerning. According to this
    http://sports.yahoo.com/olympics/va...ifth-ever-at-a-Winter-Olympics?urn=oly,219410
    there have been 5 deaths since 1964 which doesn't look concerning to me.
     
  19. Feb 12, 2010 #18

    Evo

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    The point is that this particular track is unnecessarily dangerous.

    Not to mention, not that many people luge competitively, do they? So number of deaths and injuries should be very small. Compared to the percent of deaths in pro car & motorcycle racing, it looks high.
     
  20. Feb 12, 2010 #19
    As a ratio I'm sure that luge is more safe than racing cars, for the crowd and the participants. As well where are the reports about it being due to the dangerous track? I've been hearing reports of a malfunction with the sled. Just because it looks dangerous to you and the fact that it's the fastest track in the world means nothing imo.
     
  21. Feb 12, 2010 #20

    Evo

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    So, would you say that the athletes saying this is an unsafe track is not true?
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2010
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