Optics: Designing a coating to enhance detection efficiency

In summary, the conversation discusses designing a coating for a silicon detector to enhance its detection efficiency at a specific wavelength of 351nm. It is determined that a three-layer coating with a thickness of $\frac{\lambda}{4}$ is ideal for achieving reflection. The desired index of refraction for the coating is around $\sqrt{3.42}$, and it is suggested to use a high-index material (around 3) paired with a low index material (around 1.7) for a narrower passband. Two potential materials, Yttrium Oxide and Silicon Monoxide, are identified for their appropriate indices of refraction. However, more understanding of thin films and a relevant equation relating indices and
  • #1
liesandcake
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Homework Statement


You are to design a coating to enhance the detection efficiency of a silicon detector (n=3.42 at [tex]\lambda[/tex]=351nm)
(a) Is the coting a reflection or antireflection coating?
(b) Should you use a higher or lower index material for the coating? Specify a material to use.
(c) Provide a prescription for the coating you chose for normal incident light at 351nm.
(d) Provide a prescription for the coating you chose for a 45 degree incident light at 351nm.
(e) How would you make the coating more effective for a wider range of wavelengths?


Homework Equations


[tex]e =\frac{\gamma _{rec}}{\gamma _{inc}}[/tex]
[tex]\lambda_\theta = \frac{\lambda_o}{n}\sqrt{n^2 - \sin{\theta}^2}[/tex]
[tex]n_1 t_1 = \frac{\lambda}{4}[/tex]


The Attempt at a Solution


  • I'm having trouble deciding what material to use, and which equations will allow me to specify a narrow bandpass at [tex]\lambda = 351nm[/tex].
  • So far I have defined "enhance the detection efficiency" as the number of recorded rays divided by the number of incident rays. AKA the amount of incoming rays which are actually absorbed by the detector.
  • From my textbook I have deciphered that it is better to use three layers at thickness [tex]\mbox{$\frac{\lambda}{4}$}[/tex] to ensure that there is reflection
  • I also believe I want an index of refraction somewhere around the square root of the index of the detector, which would be [tex]\sqrt{3.42} = 1.85[/tex]. I'm unsure if this applies to all layers, or if the index needs to vary. I read that it is good to have a high-index material (~3) matched with a low index material (~1.7) to create the most narrow passband.
  • I have found Yttrium Oxide and Silicon Monoxide which I believe have appropriate indices of refraction (n=1.85 and 1.86, respectively) but I have no idea how they would be combined to only allow one wavelength through.
  • I think my main issue is that I lack a core understanding of how these thin films work, and a convenient equation that relates the indices/thicknesses to wavelengths so I can see a nice passband.
 
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  • #2

Related to Optics: Designing a coating to enhance detection efficiency

1. What is the purpose of designing a coating for detection efficiency?

The purpose of designing a coating for detection efficiency is to increase the amount of light that is detected by a sensor or detector. This helps to improve the sensitivity and accuracy of measurements in various applications, such as medical imaging, remote sensing, and optical communications.

2. How does a coating enhance detection efficiency?

A coating can enhance detection efficiency by reducing the amount of light that is reflected or scattered away from the detector, and instead directing it towards the active sensing area. This can be achieved through various methods, such as anti-reflective coatings, absorbing layers, or micro-structured surfaces.

3. What factors should be considered when designing a coating for detection efficiency?

Some important factors to consider when designing a coating for detection efficiency include the wavelength of the light being detected, the angle of incidence, the material properties of the coating, and the desired level of efficiency. Other factors such as cost, durability, and environmental conditions may also need to be taken into account.

4. Are there any limitations to designing a coating for detection efficiency?

While coatings can greatly improve detection efficiency, there are limitations to their effectiveness. In some cases, the coating may only work for a specific range of wavelengths or angles of incidence. Additionally, the coating may introduce unwanted artifacts or distortions in the detected signal.

5. How can the performance of a coating for detection efficiency be evaluated?

The performance of a coating for detection efficiency can be evaluated through various methods, such as measuring the reflectance or transmittance of light at different wavelengths and angles, or by conducting experiments to compare the detection efficiency with and without the coating. Computer simulations can also be used to predict the performance of a coating before it is manufactured.

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