Output waveform after input rising edge and before output falling edge

In summary: Delay everything by one clock cycle. This provides you with a one-clock-cycle lookahead in time. Waveform A as displayed on the oscilloscope thus becomes a delayed version of the realtime waveform A.In summary, the professor said that you can use buffers and an And gate to get waveform B, but he is unsure how to get the waveform C. C can only be done if A is known in advance, and even then it is not possible to predict the falling edge.
  • #1
jaus tail
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Homework Statement
Draw any circuit (combinational, sequential to get this waveform)
Relevant Equations
And gate with one input using buffer of another input for some delay
1565977075163.png


A is given waveform, we have to use circuits to get B and C waveform. For B we can use an And Gate with 2 inputs, X and Y. X is buffered (to get some delay) and is fed to Y input of And Gate. So we'll get waveform B.

But I don't know how to get C waveform. The question is that even if I extend A, then the falling edge of C must always occur one clock cycle before input A. Is this circuit even possible? I don't think so.
 
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  • #2
Do the vertical lines represent clock edges that are available to you to build this circuit? Or do you need to do this all with RC delays?
 
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  • #3
jaus tail said:
For B we can use an And Gate with 2 inputs, X and Y. X is buffered (to get some delay) and is fed to Y input of And Gate. So we'll get waveform B.

It does appear that B is to be held low for precisely one clock cycle delay. Is this image an accurate representation of the specification? If true, then the switching delay of a gate is unlikely to be a satisfactory answer.
 
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  • #4
Vertical lines represent clock edges. The professor said you can use whatever circuit you feel like. The professor was convinced when I said use buffer gates and And gate for B waveform, but then he asked can C ever be done.
 
  • #5
jaus tail said:
Vertical lines represent clock edges.
jaus tail said:
but then he asked can C ever be done.
Of course, it's trivial. Can you show some of your thoughts on how to solve this with FFs and combinatorial logic then please?
 
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  • #6
jaus tail said:
but then he asked can C ever be done.
If these are to be kept real time, then with A being of unforeseeable length, it is not possible to set C to low at a time one clock cycle ahead of A going to low.
 
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  • #7
NascentOxygen said:
If these are to be kept real time, then with A being of unforeseeable length, it is not possible to set C to low at a time one clock cycle ahead of A going to low.
Agreed. The only way it makes sense is if C is interpreted as a duration. This is based on the statement by the OP that
jaus tail said:
Vertical lines represent clock edges.
 
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  • #8
Yeah even I was like mostly sure that it can't be done. We can't anticipate the falling edge of the input without any previous information.

Maybe it can be done if like we have history. Like one clock cycle of input passes and from second clock cycle, we want the output to act in a particular way as compared to the input. Like input is a sqaure wave and output is a wave with rising edge after rising edge of input and output has falling edge before falling edge of input. Maybe it can be done from 2nd clock cycle.

The first one can be done like this:
1566458066996.png


And gate is there and there are 2 inverters. So the rising edge of 'And' output will be after some time the input rises from 0-1.
 
  • #9
jaus tail said:
Maybe it can be done from 2nd clock cycle.
I think you are on the right track there.

I do have a question about the leading edges of B and of C though. Can they occur after any delay, or must they occur at a Clock pulse?

Cheers,
Tom
 
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  • #10
I wasn't told about anything about that. Just a few waveforms were drawn by hand and then I was asked if I can get them as output. I suggested using And gate and buffers for the first waveform where only the leading edge has a delay. For the second waveform, i tried but eventually said it couldn't be done.
 
  • #11
Sorry, I'm not seeing the difficulty. It seems like you can just use various types of FFs and some logic gates to make the two bottom waveforms from the top waveform and the clocks supplied...
 
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  • #12
berkeman said:
Sorry, I'm not seeing the difficulty. It seems like you can just use various types of FFs and some logic gates to make the two bottom waveforms from the top waveform and the clocks supplied...
How can you make the bottom waveform? How can we get the falling edge of the output, before the falling edge of the input?
 
  • #13
You said the vertical lines are clock edges. Just count clock edges...
 
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  • #14
jaus tail said:
How can you make the bottom waveform? How can we get the falling edge of the output, before the falling edge of the input?
Delay everything by one clock cycle. This provides you with a one-clock-cycle lookahead in time. Waveform A as displayed on the oscilloscope thus becomes a delayed version of the realtime waveform A.
 
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  • #15
True that they are clock edges but I don't know time period of A. if A is high for 4 clock periods, then C must be high for 2 clock periods (rise one clock period after A, and fall one clock period before A). And if A is high for 7 clock periods then C is high for 5.
The delaying A makes sense. I create circuit such that output rises after 2 clock periods of A, and output falls same as when A falls, only after this circuit, I further delay A by 1 clock period and this becomes A'
So output rises one clock period after A' and output falls same as when A falls, thus it falls 1 period before A'
 

1. What is an output waveform?

An output waveform is a graphical representation of the output signal of an electronic device or system. It shows the changes in voltage or current over time.

2. What is an input rising edge?

An input rising edge is a transition of the input signal from a low voltage level to a high voltage level. It marks the beginning of a new cycle in the input signal.

3. What is an output falling edge?

An output falling edge is a transition of the output signal from a high voltage level to a low voltage level. It marks the end of a cycle in the output signal.

4. How is the output waveform affected by the input rising edge?

The output waveform is typically affected by the input rising edge in two ways: it can trigger a response in the output signal, and it can also cause a delay or change in the shape of the output waveform.

5. Why is it important to analyze the output waveform after input rising edge and before output falling edge?

Analyzing the output waveform in this specific time frame allows for the observation of important characteristics such as propagation delay, rise and fall times, and signal distortions. This information is crucial in understanding the behavior and performance of electronic devices and systems.

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