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Peer-reviewed case study of how an ideal universe would work

  1. Sep 6, 2012 #1

    Ryan_m_b

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    Perhaps we should use this as inspiration for the rules :tongue2:
    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v489/n7414/full/489170a.html
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 6, 2012 #2

    Ben Niehoff

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    Hmm...interesting, but the writers forgot that Sacha is a boy's name.
     
  4. Sep 6, 2012 #3

    AlephZero

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    Not necessarily. http://www.toniandguy.com/pages/article/22 [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  5. Sep 7, 2012 #4
    I liked it. That's exactly what frustrates me the most about people who thinks science is "wrong", that they need only to look around themselves and they will find a million technical gadgets that would be impossible without a very thorough understanding and the correctness of sciences. There's so many proofs that science works that it must be a case of can't see the woods because of the trees.
     
  6. Sep 7, 2012 #5

    Pythagorean

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    You're both wrong, Sacha isn't really a name at all. It's pretty obvious from the way ants price eggs and shoes buckle sideways froth. Abalone.
     
  7. Sep 7, 2012 #6

    Drakkith

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    Buahaha! Love the link! It hits the bulls-eye on the problem with some people.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2012 #7
    Brilliant!
     
  9. Sep 8, 2012 #8

    chiro

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    I understand the sentiments of this "joke", but when asked a question like that the scientist or person giving the injection should point out the specific list of complications (they do have these kinds of warnings though, but they aren't highlighted effectively since they would most likely "scare" people and for good reason).

    Also a real scientist would be able to justify the probability in a highly systematic way, and based on the way I've seen some scientists abuse statistics (and just apply them without having any real idea of what they are doing), I'm not going to hold my breath.
     
  10. Sep 8, 2012 #9

    Drakkith

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    He did have a list, he just wasn't allowed to explain anything as the woman kept interrupting him.
     
  11. Sep 8, 2012 #10

    chiro

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    I say this though because this happens in real life (has happened in my experience).

    I have had a doctor in the past try and prescribe something and when I ask doctor about said side effects I get the line "it will be ok, nothing to worry about": I don't take that BS from anyone even if they are wearing a stethoscope and have a fancy framed piece of paper on the wall.

    I want to say emphatically that not all doctors are like this and don't wish to generalize in any way, but it is important to be aware that people get in situations like this all the time and sometimes staying sharp and being a little bit anal is going to help you out a lot.

    A lot of people get screwed because they get the illusion that somebody else knows best simply because they have a stethoscope, a suit, or a nice smile and a lot of confidence.

    I'm not advocating being a jerk or acting like a puritan as if they thought that the doctor was doing the work of the devil, but I do advocate people have the guts to question anybody especially if it's a major decision or something they put into their body and unforunately this doesn't happen since people just "go along with anything" a lot of the time.
     
  12. Sep 8, 2012 #11

    Drakkith

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    Chiro, it's a fictional story making a specific point, not a "trust me, I'm a doctor" statement.
     
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