Preparing for an Inclined Plane Teaching Job Interview

In summary: Do the same thing, but with circles. Draw pictures and diagrams on the board to help illustrate. You could even do this on the computer if you have a projector handy. This is also a good time to ask a follow-on question about the properties of objects when they are in more than one dimension. In summary, these are all good ideas for a teaching demonstration/lecture. You could use objects that are common in a physics classroom (like cylinders, squares, and circles), and focus on demonstrating properties of those shapes (moments of inertia, rotational, translational, and combined slipping and rolling). You could also use objects that
  • #1
Gamma
357
11
Hi every one,

For an private school teaching job interview, I need to prepare and deliver a 15 minute lesson on "weight on inclined plane". The level of this lesson, I believe, is AP Physics.

I am thinking of preparing the notes and deliver in the traditional method. Any ideas and suggestions will be highly appreciated. Do you thing that I should call them and ask what kinds of equipments are available for teaching (white board or over head projector). What is the best way to deliver a class room lesson? Do you think some kind of demonstration/visual aid might help? I am thinking of showing the different forces acting on a body on an inclined plane by some means. My 'students' will be my interviewers. How can I show them that I want to involve students in the class room teaching. If they are real students, I might ask them some pre assessment questions. I might also ask them questions during the lesson. But can I do this with the interviewers as students. It is kind of awkward. Any and every idea will be appreciated! Please share your experience as well. Thanks.

kindly,

gamma.
 
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  • #2
You may want to look at the PHeT simulation:
http://phet.colorado.edu/simulations/sims.php?sim=The_Ramp"
Note: There are ideas for lessons/activities and a set of associated "Concept questions" in the teacher submissions.

Personally, I find the topic they're choosing for you distasteful (in my experience students really don't like inclined planes much), but that's life. I did, at one point, see a nice lesson on inclined planes with the University of Maryland Open Source tutorial Physics curriculum... you might want to try to look that up.

Why do I suggest the above sources, or some use thereof? Showing you have knowledge of the latest in physics education research wouldn't be a bad thing. It does depend a bit on the school philosophy though... in addition to the fact that they might want to see you actually "perform". In that case, it'd be nice to have a short intro, a short student activity, and then a short lecture... this would balance all the tasks teachers should do.

You should ask what equipment will be available (assume there will be a white board or chalkboard... but you might want to ask about a smart board or computer projection capability, and "lab" materials, possibility including number of available computers... since you can't bring these things yourself). If you'd like to do an activity with the class, you could possibly even inquire as to whether the current teacher has the students organized into groups, and if so, what the group structure is (i.e. how many students per group). On the other hand, you could just decide on a group structure yourself and have students self-organize.
 
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  • #3
It's clear to me all they want to know is how effectively can you teach. So yes, treat the "students" as if they are in fact, students. If you teach interactively, then do that. If you prefer to lecture, then do that.

Certainly asking what materials are available is acceptable!

I would not use a canned demo/lecture- that might be perceived as poor teaching methodology. Remember, you are interviewing for a *teaching* job- show then how well you can teach!
 
  • #4
I think there are several things that you can use the basic subject matter to expand out and address, all interesting things and very visual. I still remember the first times I dealt with theses things, and how I went, "Hey, look at that! Pretty cool."

** Use a board and a weight to show how you can easily find the coefficient of 1) static and 2) dynamic friction. Do you know how to do that? Very effective demo. Follow that up with both a quick PPT slide or two, and drawing on the white board. Think of some questions to ask your audience to see if they're paying attention. You could even use the dynamic coefficient point as one of the questions (don't show it to them at first, make them figure out how to do it, and maybe even call a couple up to do it for you).

** Use an inclined plane and rolling cylinders of various constructions (maybe balls too?) to talk about moments of inertia, and how there is an extra energy term when the weight can ROLL down the ramp. Follow with a PPT slide and draw on the white board some. Call up a couple students to time a couple rolls down the ramp, and have them calculate the moments of inertia for the objects directly on the white board. Maybe ask a follow-on discussion question about combined slipping and rolling down the plane...

** Put various geometry objects on the board (like square, pentagon, octagon, etc.), and use tilts to see where they finally start to clunk down the incline. Use this, a PPT slide and the white board to talk about center of mass and Free Body Diagrams. Ask a student to calculate the board angle for some new shape, or make it a competition to see which student can get the right answer first...

Should be a fun 15 minutes! Enjoy.
 
  • #5
BTW, you might want to list some assumptions for your interviewers first before the presentation. Like, I'm assuming we've already talked about... (friction, PE, KE, others?).
 
  • #6
You might wish to briefly address WHY one might care about a "weight on inclined plane".

It's a good idea to know as much about your audience as possible.
What is their background in math, physics, science, computers, etc...?
What textbook are they using?
(Is there a desire for the school to use more technology in the classroom? or more active-learning in the classroom?)

Spring scales might help demonstrate the strength of some of the forces.
http://www.teachersource.com/Images/Product/md/sp100.jpg

Treat it like a real class. (Don't step out of character to explain what and why you are doing things a certain way.) Plan to get a set of [simple!] key points across in the 15 minutes... so that you finish gracefully [as opposed to being told that your time is up]. Plan for a 10 minute talk... because things usually take longer than you plan.

Be prepared to address questions that might come up. Rehearse.

Relax.

(Good luck.)
 
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  • #7
Thank you for these excellent suggestions! Thank you for your encouraging words as well.


Regards,

Gamma.
 

Related to Preparing for an Inclined Plane Teaching Job Interview

What is an inclined plane teaching job interview?

An inclined plane teaching job interview is a type of interview specifically designed for candidates applying for teaching positions in schools or universities. This type of interview focuses on assessing the candidate's knowledge, skills, and experience in teaching, as well as their ability to adapt to different classroom settings.

What are some tips for preparing for an inclined plane teaching job interview?

1. Research the school or university: Familiarize yourself with the institution's mission, values, and teaching methods.2. Review the job description: Make sure you understand the responsibilities and qualifications required for the position.3. Prepare answers to common teaching interview questions: Practice answering questions about your teaching philosophy, classroom management, and lesson planning.4. Bring a portfolio: Prepare a portfolio showcasing your teaching experience, lesson plans, and student work.5. Dress professionally: Make a good first impression by dressing professionally and appropriately for the interview.

What types of questions can I expect in an inclined plane teaching job interview?

The questions in an inclined plane teaching job interview may vary depending on the institution and the specific job role, but some common types of questions you may encounter include:- Questions about your teaching experience and qualifications- Questions about your teaching philosophy and approach- Questions about classroom management and behavior management strategies- Questions about lesson planning and curriculum development- Hypothetical scenarios and how you would handle them in a classroom setting- Questions about your ability to work with diverse student populations- Questions about your use of technology in the classroom

How should I prepare for a demonstration or teaching sample in an inclined plane teaching job interview?

If you are asked to give a demonstration or teaching sample during the interview, make sure to:1. Clarify the topic and audience beforehand: Understand the age group and subject matter you will be teaching.2. Prepare a lesson plan: Create a lesson plan that is engaging, interactive, and showcases your teaching skills.3. Practice beforehand: Rehearse your lesson and make any necessary adjustments.4. Bring all necessary materials: Make sure you have all the materials and resources you need for your lesson.5. Be open to feedback: After the demonstration, be open to receiving feedback and incorporating it into your teaching style.

What are some common mistakes to avoid in an inclined plane teaching job interview?

1. Not researching the institution: Make sure you have a good understanding of the institution and its values before the interview.2. Not preparing for common teaching interview questions: Practice answering common teaching interview questions to ensure you are prepared.3. Not showcasing your teaching experience: Use examples and anecdotes from your teaching experience to demonstrate your skills and qualifications.4. Not being professional: Dress professionally, arrive on time, and maintain a positive and respectful attitude throughout the interview.5. Not asking questions: Prepare some questions to ask the interviewer about the institution or the teaching position to show your interest and enthusiasm.

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