Projectile Motion Calculation: Finding the Landing Distance of a Launched Object

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In summary, the 500kg object launched from the top of a 12m building with an initial speed of 5.2m/s and angle of 38 degrees will land 7.9m away from the building, using the equations y=vit + 1/2at^2 and d=vt. The initial velocity was separated into its x and y components using cos and sin, and the positive value of time (1.923s) was used to calculate the distance. The mass of the object was negligible in this calculation.
  • #1
physicsnobrain
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Homework Statement


A 500kg object is launched from the top of a 12m building with intial speed of 5.2m/s and angle of 38degrees. How far away does object land?

Homework Equations


y=vit + 1/2at^2
quadratic formula
d=vt

The Attempt at a Solution


first i separate the initial velocity into its x and y coordinates. Using cos and sin. Next I input this found value of the y direction velocity into the y=vit + 1/2at^2. I rearrange this formula and solve it as a quadratic for time, and I use the positive time value which I got as 1.92s. Next I multiply this time value by the velocity in the x direction I got from doing the cos of the initial velocity.

I end up getting the object lands 7.9 m away from the building. Can anyone check and see if this is right? Also the mass was negligble right?
 
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  • #2
Your method is correct.

If you want your numbers to be checked, post the intermediate values you got (init. velocity components, time of flight).
 
  • #3
voko said:
Your method is correct.

If you want your numbers to be checked, post the intermediate values you got (init. velocity components, time of flight).

Well the initial velocity was 5.2m/s. The y component of this is 3.2m/s, and the x component is 4.097 m/s.

When I solve for time from the quadratic formula, I get -1.272s and 1.923s. I use the positive value cause you can't have negative time.

Now I just multiply the time by the x component velocity and get 7.9m.
 
  • #4
Everything looks good.
 
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  • #5
voko said:
Everything looks good.

Thanks.
 

1. What is a projectile launched question?

A projectile launched question is a scientific experiment that involves launching a projectile, such as a ball or rocket, into the air and observing its trajectory. This type of experiment is used to study the motion of objects through the air and can also be used to study the effects of air resistance and gravity.

2. How is a projectile launched question conducted?

To conduct a projectile launched question, you will need a projectile launcher, such as a slingshot or air cannon, and a measuring device to track the motion of the projectile. The launcher is used to launch the projectile at a specific angle and velocity, and the measuring device is used to record the distance and time of the projectile's flight.

3. What factors affect the trajectory of a projectile?

The trajectory of a projectile can be affected by several factors, including the initial velocity, angle of launch, air resistance, and gravity. These factors can be manipulated in a projectile launched question to see how they affect the path of the projectile.

4. What are some real-life applications of projectile launched questions?

Projectile launched questions have many real-life applications, such as studying the flight of a baseball or golf ball, designing rockets and missiles, and understanding the effects of wind on projectiles. These experiments can also help engineers and scientists improve the accuracy and efficiency of various technologies.

5. How can projectile launched questions be used to teach physics concepts?

Projectile launched questions are a great way to teach students about various physics concepts, such as motion, velocity, acceleration, and forces. By conducting these experiments, students can see how these concepts apply in real-life situations and gain a better understanding of them.

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