Prove that (cscx - cotx)^2 = (1-cosx)/(1+cosx)

  1. Feb 10, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    I can't seem to figure out how to prove that (cscx - cotx)^2 = (1-cosx)/(1+cosx).

    2. Relevant equations

    I believe I just need to do appropriate substitution using compound angle formulas, double angle formulas, etc...

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I got as far as this

    1 + cot^2x - 2(1/tanx)(1/sinx) + cot^2x = (1-cosx)/(1+cosx)

    Can anyone help me figure this out? Thanks in advance!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 10, 2009 #2

    Dick

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    It's not that complicated. Turn everything into sin's and cos's. The denominator is sin(x)^2. That's (1-cos^2(x)). Factor it.
     
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