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Reaction between iron(II) sulphate, sulphuric acid

  1. May 17, 2005 #1

    Aly

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    If i have a reaction between iron(II) sulphate, sulphuric acid and potassium permanganate (KMnO4), what are the ions present in the salt??!

    similarly, if i have a reaction between nitric acid and copper solid, what are the ions present in salt?

    can nebody help me? thx :)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 17, 2005 #2
    Write out the balanced equation and find your active and spectating ions.
     
  4. May 17, 2005 #3

    dextercioby

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    The second one is really easy,textbook i might say.

    [tex]Cu+HNO_{3}\rightarrow \mbox{salt}+\mbox{oxyde}+\mbox{water} [/tex]

    Daniel.
     
  5. May 17, 2005 #4
    Unfortunately the question is asking for ions not just the movement of substances. And also it is an ACID + METAL reaction and those reactions always give hydrogen + salt.

    So you must consider whether the elements will lose electrons (as metals do) to become stable (a full outer shell of electrons) or whether they need to gain electrons (as non-metals do).

    In the case of the former, the ions formed are of course +ve as the -ve charge of the atom (the electron) has been made smaller by its removal.

    Conversly, for a non-metal the ve charge becomes bigger as more electrons (and therefore more -ve charge) is present.

    It may be helpful, to write out the ionic equation and then figure out which ones don't change.

    i.e.
    [tex]Cu^+^2+2(H^+NO_{3}^-)\rightarrow\mbox{Cu^+^2 (NO_{3})_{2}^-}+H_{2}[/tex]

    sorry - but for some reason the LaTeX image won't form or i fit does it is not the image i requested!! - hopefully somebody can tell me where i have gone wrong, as the image shows up when i preview the post!!

    The equation I was trying to show however is this
    (Cu^+2) + 2({HNO_{3}^-) goes to (Cu^+^2) (NO_{3})_{2}^-}+ H_{2}

    (A [tex]+[/tex] or [tex]-[/tex] with no number after it indicates a +1 or -1 charge respectively.

    As you know all compounds must be neutral in their charge. Therefore there has to be 2 nitrates to every 1 copper as copper has a +2 charge and nitrate has a -1 charge. Please also note the Nitrate is treated as an element - this is because it is what is known as a free radical.

    The two is added before the nitric acid on the LHS (left hand side of the equation) to balance the number of hydrogen and nitrate molecules on each side - as in every chemical reaction nothing is lost (conservation of mass).

    N.B. The hydrogen forms [tex]H_2[/tex] as it is a diatomic gas (it needs to atoms to be a stable compound with a H-H covalent bond)

    As regards the first question, I am not sure where to start, if you post the whole equation here it would be helpful, or you may now see how to balance the equation and represent the ions.

    Finally, in the equation shown it is an ionic equation as it shows the movement of ions.

    Regards,

    Ben
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2005
  6. May 17, 2005 #5

    dextercioby

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    Yo,man,start reading before you try to correct someone,who,in this case,is right.

    [tex] 3Cu+8HNO_{3}\rightarrow 3Cu(NO_{3})_{2}+2NO\uparrow +4H_{2}O [/tex]

    The reaction works only with concentrated acid.

    Daniel.
     
  7. May 17, 2005 #6
    Sorry man,

    i was wrong even if it was dilute acid as it produces :

    Cu(s) + 4HNO3(aq) ——> Cu(NO3)2(aq) + 2NO2(g) + 2H2O(l)

    damn !why isn't it just a metal + acid ----> hydrogen + salt reaction?

    Ben.
     
  8. May 17, 2005 #7

    dextercioby

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    There's only one explanation.The Beketov-Volta series:where is Copper situated wrt the Hydrogen...?

    Daniel.
     
  9. May 17, 2005 #8

    Borek

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  10. May 17, 2005 #9

    dextercioby

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    Actually 3,if u consider the Kalium one.

    Daniel.
     
  11. May 17, 2005 #10

    GCT

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    it probably has to do with each metal's characteristic LUMO, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital. The following website has a brief explanation (regarding our case...you'll have to scroll to the very bottom, takes a while)

    http://www.meta-synthesis.com/webbook/12_lab/lab.html
     
  12. May 17, 2005 #11

    GCT

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    as well as the highest occupied molecular orbital.
     
  13. May 18, 2005 #12

    Borek

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  14. May 18, 2005 #13

    Borek

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  15. May 18, 2005 #14
    Edit: brain fart
     
  16. May 18, 2005 #15
    Not too sure but where do you get a bottle of copper atoms ?
     
  17. May 18, 2005 #16

    GCT

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    Browse through the link.
     
  18. May 18, 2005 #17

    Borek

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  19. May 18, 2005 #18

    GCT

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    again, follow up on the link...
     
  20. May 18, 2005 #19

    GCT

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  21. May 18, 2005 #20

    Borek

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