Resonance need explanation (No maths)

In summary: When the applied frequency on a mass is equal to the natural frequency, the mass resonates. It has a great amplitude as a result of this. However, increasing the mass will shift the resonant frequency lower. Stiffer springs will also have a negative effect on the resonant frequency.
  • #1
goku999
19
0
I know that when the applied frequency on a mass is equal to the natural frequency, the mass resonates. It has a great amplitude as a result of this.

But I don't know how somethings affect the resonant frequency.

Like for a mass-spring system.
1) What effect would increasing the mass have on the resonant frequency?
2) What effect would stiffer springs have on a resonant frequency?

Also if a vehicle that is lightly damped passing over a bump at a certain speed, its chassis
bounced violently.
I know this is because the resonant frequency is equal to the applied frequency.
Does constructive interference play a part for the huge increase in amplitude?

3) What effect would it have on the resonant frequency of the vehicle is traveling at a different speed?
4) What effect would it have on the resonant frequency if more passengers were in the car?

Thanks, I just need some explanations so I can understand this.
 
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  • #2
Well, what do you think in the case of -1- and -2-? Think about a guitar string. What happens to the tone of the plucked string as you tighten the string? That should help you with -2-. Why do they use heavier strings for the lower note strings? That should help you with -1-. For the others, what does your textbook say about constructive interference?
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
What happens to the tone of the plucked string as you tighten the string?

I don't know anything about guitars but,

I think if the string was tightened it would give a high note so does this make the resonant frequency higher because the frequency of the string would be greater?

berkeman said:
Why do they use heavier strings for the lower note strings?

Heavier strings give lower notes so does this mean it will shift the resonant frequency lower?

berkeman said:
what does your textbook say about constructive interference?

The textbook which has these questions don't provide any answers.
It also does not contain any information about constructive and destructive interference. I remember the constructive interference from experiments done in class. Something about waves reinforcing each other and canceling when destructive interference happens.
I just had a thought if these played a part in resonance.

Also if the resonant frequency is increased/decreased does that make it harder/easier for the applied frequency to make it resonate? Or it doesn't affect it at all?
 

Related to Resonance need explanation (No maths)

1. What is resonance?

Resonance is a phenomenon that occurs when an object or system vibrates at its natural frequency in response to an external force. This results in a dramatic increase in the amplitude of the vibration.

2. What causes resonance?

Resonance is caused by an external force or disturbance that is applied to a system at or near its natural frequency. This can be in the form of sound waves, electromagnetic waves, or physical forces.

3. Why is resonance important?

Resonance is important because it can have both positive and negative effects. In some cases, it can be used to amplify signals and enhance performance, such as in musical instruments. However, it can also lead to destructive vibrations, which can cause damage to structures and machinery.

4. How can resonance be controlled?

Resonance can be controlled by changing the frequency of the external force or by altering the natural frequency of the object or system. This can be done through design modifications, such as adding dampers, or by changing the mass or stiffness of the object.

5. What are some real-life examples of resonance?

Some common examples of resonance include the vibrations of a guitar string, the sound produced by a tuning fork, and the oscillations of a swing. Other examples include the collapse of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge due to wind-induced resonance and the shattering of a glass when a singer hits a high note that matches its natural frequency.

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