Simple Harmonic Motion: Why is acceleration positive at maximum displacement?

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For example, I have a pendulum with amplitude of 2m, when the pendulum is at a displacement of 2m, wouldn't the acceleration be negative as the restoring force is acting towards equilibrium? The equation I am taught is that maximum acceleration is (2*pi*frequency)^2 * amplitude, which is a positive value?
 

A.T.

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The equation I am taught is that maximum acceleration is (2*pi*frequency)^2 * amplitude, which is a positive value?
It's the maximal magnitude of acceleration, which always positive. The actual acceleration is a vector, which can point in different directions, depending on the sign of it's components.
 
It's the maximal magnitude of acceleration, which always positive. The actual acceleration is a vector, which can point in different directions, depending on the sign of it's components.
Oh I see, the book didn't mention that. Thanks.
 

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