Single slit Diffraction using green light

In summary, the problem asks for the width of the central bright band created by monochromatic green light with a wavelength of 546 nm passing through a single slit with a width of 0.095 mm and located 75 cm away from a screen. The suggested equation for solving this problem is D sin 0dark = m 入. The solution should only measure to the halfway point of the dark band instead of the centre. A helpful resource for solving this problem is http://www.walter-fendt.de/ph14e/singleslit.htm" [Broken].
  • #1
13
0

Homework Statement




Monochromatic green light of wavelength
546 nm falls on a single slit with a width
of 0.095 mm. The slit is located 75 cm from
a screen. How wide will the central bright
band be?




Homework Equations



D sin 0dark = m 入

The Attempt at a Solution



Can someone tell me why i keep getting double of the answer? ans is 4.3 mm
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Aren't you measuring all the way to the centre of the dark band and considering that to be the width of the bright band? Surely you should stop halfway.


This is useful...

http://www.walter-fendt.de/ph14e/singleslit.htm" [Broken]
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3


I would first check the equation being used and make sure all units are consistent. It appears that the equation being used is the correct one for single slit diffraction, but it is important to make sure the units are all in the same system (e.g. all in meters or all in millimeters).

Next, I would check the calculation to see if any mistakes were made. If the calculation is correct, then I would consider other factors that could affect the result, such as the accuracy of the measurement of the slit width or the wavelength of the light. It is also possible that the experiment was not done under ideal conditions, which could affect the accuracy of the result.

In order to accurately determine the width of the central bright band, it may be necessary to repeat the experiment multiple times and take an average of the results. This would help to account for any potential errors or variations in the measurement.

Overall, it is important to carefully consider all factors and potential sources of error when conducting scientific experiments and interpreting results.
 

What is single slit diffraction using green light?

Single slit diffraction using green light is a phenomenon that occurs when a single slit is illuminated with green light. As the light passes through the slit, it diffracts, or bends, causing a pattern of light and dark bands to appear on a screen behind the slit.

How does single slit diffraction using green light differ from other types of diffraction?

Single slit diffraction is different from other types of diffraction, such as double slit or multiple slit diffraction, because it only involves one slit. This results in a simpler diffraction pattern with wider and more evenly spaced bands of light and dark.

What factors affect the diffraction pattern in single slit diffraction using green light?

The diffraction pattern in single slit diffraction using green light is affected by the width of the slit, the wavelength of the light, and the distance between the slit and the screen. A wider slit, shorter wavelength, and longer distance will result in a wider and more spread out diffraction pattern.

Can single slit diffraction using green light be observed in everyday life?

Yes, single slit diffraction using green light can be observed in everyday life. For example, when light passes through a small opening in a fence or between tree branches, a similar pattern of light and dark bands can be seen on the ground or on a nearby surface.

What are the practical applications of single slit diffraction using green light?

Single slit diffraction using green light has several practical applications, including in spectroscopy, where it is used to analyze the properties of different materials based on the diffraction pattern produced. It is also used in the production of holograms and in creating certain types of optical filters.

Suggested for: Single slit Diffraction using green light

Replies
4
Views
496
Replies
9
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
803
Replies
2
Views
841
Replies
9
Views
565
Replies
3
Views
850
Replies
3
Views
1K
Back
Top