Solving Magnetic Field & Current Direction Problems

In summary, the problem involves two parallel circular coils with a diameter of 30.0 cm and separated by 22.0 cm along the same line. The closer coil has a clockwise current of 2.50 A and the goal is to find the magnitude and direction of the current in the other coil so that the net magnetic field on the line between the two coils has a magnitude of 4.10 µT and points away from the experimenter viewing the coils along the line. The equations used are B1 = μo I r2 / [ 2 (r2 + x2 ) 3/2 ] and i2 = i1*(B2/B1). It is suggested to investigate "Helmh
  • #1
superslow991
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Homework Statement



Two circular coils of diameter 30.0 cm are parallel to each other and have their centers along the same line L but separated by 22.0 cm. When an experimenter views the coils along L, the coil closer to her carries a clockwise current of 2.50 A. Find the magnitude and sense (clockwise or counterclockwise) of the current needed in the other coil so that the net magnetic field on L midway between the two coils will have a magnitude of 4.10 µT and point away from the experimenter who is viewing the coils along L. (μ0 = 4π × 10-7 T ∙ m/A)

Homework Equations


B1 = μo I r2 / [ 2 (r2 + x2 ) 3/2 ]

i2 = i1*(B2/B1)

The Attempt at a Solution


Trying to figure out the direction of the coils, field, and current. I believe the magnetic field is in direction of the current? the current is in direction of the length?
 
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  • #3
The problem doesn't state how many turns there are in the coils. Perhaps they are single loops?

It might be beneficial to investigate: "Helmholtz coils".
 
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  • #4
gneill said:
The problem doesn't state how many turns there are in the coils. Perhaps they are single loops?

It might be beneficial to investigate: "Helmholtz coils".
I thought of that, but wasn't sure -- the OP doesn't mention any length, even though that is rather important information. Is it so that 'coil' includes 'zero-length' coils and 'solenoid' usually refers to longer cylinders, or are both terms completely equivalent ?
 

Related to Solving Magnetic Field & Current Direction Problems

What is a magnetic field?

A magnetic field is a physical field produced by electrically charged objects. It exerts a force on other charged particles and can also be influenced by these particles.

How do you determine the direction of a magnetic field?

The direction of a magnetic field is determined by the direction in which a north pole of a magnet would move if placed in the field. This is known as the right-hand rule, where the thumb points in the direction of the current and the fingers curl in the direction of the magnetic field.

What is the relationship between magnetic fields and electric currents?

Magnetic fields are generated by the flow of electric current. The strength and direction of the magnetic field depend on the magnitude and direction of the current. Similarly, a changing magnetic field can induce an electric current in a conductor.

How do you solve magnetic field problems in a conductor?

To solve magnetic field problems in a conductor, you can use the Biot-Savart Law, which calculates the magnetic field at a point due to a small current element. You can also use Ampere's Law, which relates the magnetic field around a closed loop to the current passing through the loop.

Can magnetic fields and electric currents be used in practical applications?

Yes, magnetic fields and electric currents have many practical applications, such as in electric motors, generators, and transformers. They are also used in medical devices like MRI machines and in technologies like magnetic levitation trains.

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