SpaceX Dragon docking simulator

  • SpaceX
  • Thread starter gleem
  • Start date
  • #1
gleem
Science Advisor
Education Advisor
1,656
1,011

Summary:

Online ISS docking simulator for the Dragon capsule

Main Question or Discussion Point

Practice your skills at docking Dragon with the ISS. Could be a lot more stressful in the real thing.


https://iss-sim.spacex.com/
 
  • Like
Likes jackwhirl, nsaspook, .Scott and 3 others

Answers and Replies

  • #2
.Scott
Homework Helper
2,536
914
Got it on the first try. Zero out Roll, Pitch, Yaw. Bring Y and Z close to zero. Then move in slowly - adjusting Y and Z as required.

I approached at about 12cm/sec until I was within a few meters. Orbital mechanics did not seem to be an issue.
 
  • Like
  • Love
Likes Ibix and anorlunda
  • #3
anorlunda
Staff Emeritus
Insights Author
8,599
5,491
That was fun. I also nailed it the first time using @.Scott 's tips.

It reminds me of the Lunar Lander simulator on my old Apple ][. I crashed most of the time but my kids could do it fine.
 
  • #4
Filip Larsen
Gold Member
1,257
184
Since the simulation starts you with zero relative velocity and since translatory controls has a fairly big impulse bit it is easy to get a "non-zeroable" velocity bias in Z and Y if you change attitude while translating. I wonder if the impulse bit really is this high in the real Dragon and if docking pilot really only have access to this simple "bang-bang" control.

Also, didn't notice any orbital effects either. For a v-bar approach I would expect there to be a small downward rate when closing on the station. And if you just let Dragon sit at its initial position (assuming that position is displaced along the h-bar axis through ISS center of mass) it should oscillate in Y in sync with the orbit.
 
Last edited:
  • #5
Ibix
Science Advisor
Insights Author
6,468
5,160
First time, too. Practiced holding y and z down to the ##\pm 0.2\mathrm{m}## tolerance while closing, then decided to hold it to ##\pm 2\mathrm{m}## while closing the range - not wasting reaction mass or wearing myself out. Braked about 10m out and got the y/z tolerances under control, had one bad moment when the green HUD diamond suddenly skated off and vanished, but I think you're just supposed to eyeball it in on the black cross on the docking port at that point.

@Filip Larsen - I also wondered why there wasn't a "zero my x/y/z velocity please" button, or a timed duration burn option.
 
  • #6
Klystron
Gold Member
690
939
Nice flight sim, thanks. Never played video games so the controls seem strange without a joystick. Good visuals but I could sure use a raw radar display with closing rates. I'll attempt to dock when I figure out the controls and my hands work.
 
  • #7
207
144
I enjoyed this. It's neat how close this was to the sim that the astronauts are using, shown in the video linked at the end.
Anyone else notice the flat earth easter egg in the settings menu?
 
  • Haha
Likes berkeman
  • #8
34,390
10,476
It's possible to fly through some parts of the ISS. One module I found even had some containers inside, I wonder who put that in the simulation.

By default docking will be done automatically, but with these controls it's really easy.

Orbital mechanics has a timescale of the orbital period, or ~90 minutes, and we start in the same orbit (just ahead of the station) as well. As long as you don't take half an hour for the docking it's negligible.
 
  • Like
Likes Ibix
  • #9
34,390
10,476
Found another Easter egg. Turn around at the initial position and then look a bit upwards.

docking.png


It's pretty close, you can fly to it. If you hit it the simulation claims you collided with the ISS.
 
  • Like
Likes Ibix
  • #10
Ibix
Science Advisor
Insights Author
6,468
5,160
Found another Easter egg. Turn around at the initial position and then look a bit upwards.

View attachment 263315

It's pretty close, you can fly to it. If you hit it the simulation claims you collided with the ISS.
Is that what your avatar is driving?
 
  • #12
1,459
874
There are PC dedicated keys with this (are they indicated somewhere by SpaceX?). The left yoke uses QWE and ASD and the right yoke uses <> and the positioning arrows (or the number pad?). Much easier for me.
 
  • Like
Likes Filip Larsen and Ibix

Related Threads on SpaceX Dragon docking simulator

Replies
15
Views
593
Replies
0
Views
2K
  • Last Post
8
Replies
182
Views
12K
Replies
35
Views
4K
  • Last Post
4
Replies
81
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
957
Replies
12
Views
1K
Replies
7
Views
833
Top