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Specific Heat Capacity - high pressure gas

  1. Mar 1, 2007 #1
    I am designing a cracking furnace to crack Ethylene Dichloride. the furnace is at around 500 C and 2 M Pa. To perform an energy balance I need the specific heat capacity of the EDC at the aforementioned temperature and pressure. I can only find it at standard conditions and can find no way of 'scaling it up' to my required conditions. Is there any way to do this?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 1, 2007 #2

    Q_Goest

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    Hi Nathan,
    The database I have gives:
    Specific Heat, Cv (Btu/lb F) = 0.2921
    Specific Heat, Cp (Btu/lb F) = 0.3184

    (given Ethylene Dichloride (1,2-Dichloroethane) @ 500 C and 2 MPa)
     
  4. Mar 1, 2007 #3

    Gokul43201

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    QG: What database is this? Sounds like a keeper!
     
  5. Mar 1, 2007 #4

    Q_Goest

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    Yep, I love it! Unfortunately it's proprietary.
     
  6. Mar 2, 2007 #5
    Thanks.

    Thanks for the reply. Seems like a very handy database to have
     
  7. Feb 16, 2011 #6
    Hi,

    I'm involved in an effort to upgrade the thernal mass flow controllers used in the petrochemical industry.

    I've noted that current MFCs have a weakness in that Cp specific heat capacitance changes as a function of pressure. For example 14% for N2 and near 0% for He. Density and Cp are the main drivers on sensor sensitity and it will change with pressure.

    I will eventually need to test a couple of dozen gases. I want to get an idea of the monotomoica vs diatomic vs polyatomic influence before hand and afterward to compare my data existing references in the 0 to 4000 PSIA range.

    I have not found much in the reference on many gases other than N2. Does anyone have any suggestions for references. I can trade data or maybe look at a specific gas as a quid per quo. We can do flamable, corrosive or nasty gases at our unique facility.

    Thanks
    Dan
     
  8. Feb 17, 2011 #7

    Q_Goest

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