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Featured Other STEM Bibles List

  1. Apr 24, 2018 #1

    Demystifier

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    By STEM I mean science, technology, engineering and math. By a bible, I mean a book which is comprehensive, big and heavy (both physically and intellectually), authoritative, and generally highly respected in the community as the standard book that contains more-or-less everything one needs to know about the subject.

    The examples in physics are:

    - general physics:
    The Feynman Lectures on Physics (3 volumes)

    - classical mechanics:
    H. Goldstein et al, Classical Mechanics

    - classical electromagnetism:
    J.D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics

    - general relativity:
    C.W Misner, K.S. Thorne and J.A. Wheeler, Gravitation

    - quantum mechanics:
    Surprisingly, I don't know which of the standard QM textbooks would deserve this title.

    - quantum information and computation:
    M.A. Nielsen and I.L. Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information

    - quantum field theory:
    the old testament: S. Weinberg, The Quantum Theory of Fields Volume I
    the new testament: S. Weinberg, The Quantum Theory of Fields Volume II
    (There is also the Volume III on supersymmetry, but it does not have such a high reputation.)

    What are your examples?
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2018
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  3. Apr 24, 2018 #2

    Wrichik Basu

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    For QM, you can surely include Griffiths' Introduction to Quantum Mechanics and Ramamurti Shankar's Principles of Quantum Mechanics. Though finding a book containing everything in QM is not possible.

    For general physics, Halliday's Fundamentals of Physics and H. C.Verma's Concepts of Physics do require a mention.
     
  4. Apr 24, 2018 #3

    ZapperZ

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    Solid State Physics - Ashcroft and Mermin
    Intro to Solid State Physics - Kittel

    Many-Particle Physics - G.D. Mahan

    Introduction to Superconductivity - Tinkham

    Principles of Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy - E.L. Wolf

    Zz.
     
  5. Apr 24, 2018 #4

    Demystifier

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    Those are certainly good books, but I am not convinced that they deserve the title of "bible". Does someone has other suggestions? Perhaps Cohen-Tannoudji, Diu and Laloe?
     
  6. Apr 24, 2018 #5

    Demystifier

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    I am not familiar with Verma, but yes, Halliday and Resnick is a bible.
     
  7. Apr 24, 2018 #6

    Andy Resnick

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    Born and Wolf "Principles of Optics"
    Alberts etc. "Molecular Biology of the Cell"
    Boron and Boulpaep "Medical Physiology"
    Bird and Lightfoot "Transport Phenomena"
     
  8. Apr 24, 2018 #7

    DrClaude

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    Why not Ballentine? Some time ago Messiah may have been a bible, but I think it is too old now.
     
  9. Apr 24, 2018 #8

    Demystifier

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    Yes, Messiah was considered bible in the past, but not any more. I was thinking about Ballentine too, but some people dispute it (e.g. @atyy ) and it does not seem to be cited very frequently.
     
  10. Apr 24, 2018 #9

    Demystifier

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    It's really not my expertise, but isn't Guyton the bible of medical physiology too?
     
  11. Apr 24, 2018 #10

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    Never understood the term "general physics"; isn't it included already in EM and CM and Thermodynamics?
     
  12. Apr 24, 2018 #11

    DrClaude

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    Atomic and Molecular Physics: Bransden and Joachain

    Are you considering also handbooks? In which case, I would add Gradshteyn and Ryzhik for integrals and Abramowitz and Stegun for mathematical functions.
     
  13. Apr 24, 2018 #12

    George Jones

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    Sorry, but I am going to be quite critical here.

    Griffiths' quantum mechanics book is neither comprehensive nor intellectually heavy. It is too much like the first US #1 hit by the Beatles.
     
  14. Apr 24, 2018 #13

    Demystifier

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    The same Wolf has co-authored also another bible: Mandel and Wolf, Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics.
    Incidentally, another Wolf has been mentioned above in a book on quantum tunneling.
     
  15. Apr 24, 2018 #14

    Andy Resnick

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    Guyton is another good reference text. Both are good references.
     
  16. Apr 24, 2018 #15

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    For QFT, Peskin and Schroeder have the size of the bible, as for "you can find more or less everything in it", it's not even true for Weinberg's textbook, well "more or less" is an ill-defined notion anyway... :-D
     
  17. Apr 24, 2018 #16

    George Jones

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    If Halliday and Resnick can be included, than a book that is a something like a grad-level Halliday and Resnick also can be included, the amazing 1400+ page "Modern Classical Physics: Optics, Fluids, Plasmas, Elasticity, Relativity, and Statistical Physics" by (Nobel laureate) Thorne and Blandford
     
  18. Apr 25, 2018 #17

    Demystifier

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    Yes. The only problem with that book is that it is still too young (and hence not yet so generally respected in the community) to be called a bible. But in a couple of yours, it will probably become a bible.
     
  19. Apr 25, 2018 #18

    vanhees71

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    Here's my list. I take the freedom to also mention some German textbooks (order roughly reflects my opinion about the quality). It's for sure incomplete!

    Textbook series (theory course):

    A. Sommerfeld, Lectures on Theoretical Physics (6 vols)
    M. Bartelmann et al, Theoretische Physik
    W. Weizel, Lehrbuch der theoretischen Physik (2 vols)
    R. P. Feynman, The Feynman Lectures (3 vols)
    L.D. Landau, E. M. Lifshitz, Course on Theoretical Physics (10 vols)
    W. Pauli, Lectures on Theoretical Physics (6 vols)
    W. Greiner et al Theoretical Physics (13 vols)

    QM:

    P.A.M. Dirac Principles of Quantum Mechanics
    W. Pauli, Principles of Wave Mechanics
    L. Ballentine, Quantum Mechanics
    J. J. Sakurai, Modern Quantum Mechanics
    S. Weinberg, Lectures on Quantum Mechanics
    A. Sommerfeld, Atombau und Spektrallinien (Wellenmechanischer Ergänzungsband)
    Messiah, Quantum Mechanics (2 vols.)

    Classical Physics:

    K. Thorn, R.D. Blandford, Modern Classical Physics

    E&M:

    J. Schwinger et al, Classical Electrodynamics
    J. D. Jackson, Classical Electrodynamics (2nd edition; 3rd is spoiled by using SI and Gaussian units in one book!)
    M. Schwartz, Principles of Electrodynamics
    D. J. Griffiths, Introduction to Electrodynamics

    (Quantum) Optics:

    M. Born, E. Wolf, The Principles of Optics
    J. C. Garrison, R. Y. Ciao, Quantum Optics
    M. O. Scully, M. S. Zubairy, Quantum Optics
    L. Mandel, E. Wolf, Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics

    Relativistic Quantum Field Theory:

    S. Weinberg, Quantum Theory of Fields (3 vols)
    A. Duncan, The Conceptual Framework of Quantum Field Theory
    M. D. Schwartz, Quantum Field Theory and the Standard Model
    D. Bailin, A. Love, Introduction to Gauge Field Theory

    Thermodynamics and (Quantum) Statistics:

    H. B. Callen, Thermodynamics and an Introduction to Thermostatistics
    A. Katz, Principles of Statistical Mechanics
    F. Reif, Fundamentals of Statistical and Thermal Physics

    Thermal QFT

    J. I. Kapusta, C. Gale, Finite-temperature Field Theory
    M. Le Bellac, Thermal Field Theory
    M. Laine, A. Vuorinen, Basics of Thermal Field Theory

    Kinetic Theory


    C. Cercignani, G. M. Kremer, The relativistic Boltzmann Equation
    S. R. de Groot, W. A. van Leeuwen, Ch. G. van Weert, Relativistic Kinetic Theory
    H. Risken, The Fokker-Planck Equation
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
  20. Apr 25, 2018 #19

    jasonRF

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    Golub and Van Loan, Matrix Computations.
    Collin, Field Theory of Guided Waves.
     
  21. Apr 26, 2018 #20

    Demystifier

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    @vanhees71 that's a great list, but many of those books do not satisfy all the criteria for being called a "bible". Some are not so big, some are not so well known, ...

    And BTW, I am surprised that you didn't mention the Greiner et al series (14 vols).
     
  22. Apr 26, 2018 #21
  23. Apr 26, 2018 #22

    TeethWhitener

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    March's Advanced Organic Chemistry is a 2-volume monster that covers just about everything you can think to do with carbon.
     
  24. Apr 27, 2018 #23

    DrClaude

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    I should add Gerhard Herzberg 4-volume Molecular Spectra and Molecular Structure.
     
  25. Apr 27, 2018 #24

    Demystifier

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    Isn't it 3-volume?
     
  26. Apr 27, 2018 #25

    Demystifier

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    Knuth - The Art of Computer Programming, 4 volumes.

    (Knuth is also known as the creator of TeX.)
     
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