Stress in thick walled cylinders

In summary, The conversation is about a person trying to do calculations with experimental data but struggling with rearrangement. They ask for help and provide the equation they are working with. Another person suggests letting (E/1-v^2) be represented as Q and asks what would happen when Q is moved to the other side. The person trying to do calculations then shares their revised equation and asks for confirmation if it looks correct.
  • #1
bluffreggie
8
0
Hi guys,

I found some experimental data on a website the other day and i have been trying to do some calculations.

Im getting suck up on the rearrangement(never been my strong point) and its driving me bonkers!

Any help at all would be appricated.

need to have er as the subject.

sigma r = (E/1-v^2)*(er-veh)

Ive had a go and all I am getting is;

er = sigma r * (1-v^2)+veh all over E

can anyone confirm?

Thanks
 
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  • #2
if you let (E/1-v^2) = Q then what would happen when you move Q to the other side? the 2nd bracket (er-veh) can now be opened.
 
  • #3
Right ok then, i have sigma r /Q = er - veh,
then I have

(sigma r/Q)+veh=er

does this look better?
 

Related to Stress in thick walled cylinders

What is the definition of "stress" in thick walled cylinders?

The term "stress" refers to the internal force per unit area that resists the deformation of a material. In the context of thick walled cylinders, stress is typically measured in terms of pressure, or the force acting perpendicular to a unit area of the cylinder's cross-section.

How is stress calculated in thick walled cylinders?

In thick walled cylinders, stress can be calculated using the Lamé equations, which take into account the internal and external pressure, as well as the dimensions and material properties of the cylinder. Alternatively, finite element analysis can be used to determine stress in more complex scenarios.

What factors can cause stress in thick walled cylinders?

Stress in thick walled cylinders can be caused by a variety of factors, including internal or external pressure, changes in temperature, or external forces such as applied loads or constraints. Material properties, such as the modulus of elasticity and yield strength, also play a role in determining stress.

What are the potential consequences of high stress in thick walled cylinders?

High stress in thick walled cylinders can lead to failure or rupture of the cylinder, which can have serious consequences depending on the application. For example, in industrial settings, a ruptured cylinder could result in the release of dangerous substances, while in medical settings, it could cause harm to patients.

How can stress in thick walled cylinders be mitigated?

To mitigate stress in thick walled cylinders, engineers can make design changes such as altering the dimensions or materials used, as well as implementing measures such as reinforcement or stress relief procedures. Regular maintenance and inspection can also help identify and address potential stress points before they become problematic.

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