Thickness from Moment of Inertia

In summary, the conversation discusses creating a parametric spreadsheet to predict the behavior of a sign post in specific wind speeds. The question at hand is whether it is possible to calculate the pipe's wall thickness using the moment of inertia, and the answer is yes. However, there are multiple factors to consider when choosing the appropriate size and strength of the pipe, including economics. The equation provided is correct, but without knowing both the outside and inside diameters, it is impossible to solve for the wall thickness.
  • #1
Mechanical-909
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Hi guys... I am creating a parametric spreadsheet to predict the behaviour of a sign post when subject to a specified wind speed for a uni assignment . Currently half way through creating the spreadsheet and one of the questions requires me to calculate a wall thickness of the pipe using the moment of inertia.. is this possible? if so how? please help guys all solutions are welcome :)!

Thanks
 
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  • #2
The moment of inertia of the pipe depends upon its wall thickness and diameter. The larger the diameter, the smaller the required thickness. Once you determine I, you may have to choose amongst available sizes and strengths, with economics also in mind, amongst other considerations.
 
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  • #3
PhanthomJay said:
The moment of inertia of the pipe depends upon its wall thickness and diameter. The larger the diameter, the smaller the required thickness. Once you determine I, you may have to choose amongst available sizes and strengths, with economics also in mind, amongst other considerations.

Okay thank you. Guess my question is that, is possible from the equation: PI/64*(Od^4 - Id^4) Od being outside Diameter and Id being the inside diameter.
 
  • #4
Mechanical-909 said:
Okay thank you. Guess my question is that, is possible from the equation: PI/64*(Od^4 - Id^4) Od being outside Diameter and Id being the inside diameter.
that equation is correct for the moment of inertia, but you have two unknowns, the outside and inside diameters, so you can't solve for either without assuming one of the variables or choosing the lowest weight available tube that will support the load.
 

1. What is the concept of "Thickness from Moment of Inertia"?

The concept of "Thickness from Moment of Inertia" refers to the relationship between an object's thickness and its moment of inertia, which is a measure of its resistance to rotational motion. It is used to determine the distribution of mass within an object and how this affects its rotational behavior.

2. How is "Thickness from Moment of Inertia" calculated?

"Thickness from Moment of Inertia" is calculated by dividing the moment of inertia of an object by its density and cross-sectional area. This gives a measure of the object's thickness, which can then be used to analyze its rotational behavior.

3. What is the significance of "Thickness from Moment of Inertia" in engineering?

In engineering, "Thickness from Moment of Inertia" is important for designing and analyzing structures and machines that undergo rotational motion. It helps engineers determine the amount and distribution of material needed to achieve the desired stiffness and strength in a rotating object.

4. How does "Thickness from Moment of Inertia" affect the stability of an object?

The thickness of an object, as determined by its moment of inertia, can greatly impact its stability. A higher moment of inertia, and therefore a greater thickness, means that an object will be more resistant to changes in its rotational motion. This can increase the stability of the object and prevent it from tipping or wobbling.

5. Can "Thickness from Moment of Inertia" be adjusted or controlled?

Yes, the thickness of an object can be adjusted or controlled by changing its shape, size, or material composition. By altering the moment of inertia, engineers can manipulate the rotational behavior and stability of an object to suit their design needs.

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