Type of resistance imposed by eddy currents in inductors?

  • Thread starter Landru
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I've got a rather simple inquiry, but I haven't been able to get a straight answer via Google searches.

When evaluating the impedance of an inductor, do eddy currents represent a series resistance through, or a parallel resistance around the ideal inductor?

I've read that eddy currents are resistive, suggesting they are a series resistance, but also that they "short circuit" the inductor, which would imply passage around the inductor, so I'm not sure which is the case.
 
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  • #2
jim hardy
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Hmmmm ..... Thevenin vs Norton ?

If you're talking about sine wave excitation why can't it be either way ?

No current through inductor , no eddy currents suggests series would work okay
No voltage across inductor no current through its parallel resistance suggests parallel works too.

Think about it - eddy currents are caused by flux in the core which results from current through the windings
for sinewave excitation flux and voltage are in proportion. dsin(wt) = wcos(wt)
 

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