Understanding the Single Slit Diffraction Pattern

In summary, the single slit diffraction pattern is created when a wave interferes with itself, with the interference occurring from all the smaller "wavelets" that make up the wave. This can be seen in the double slit experiment, where two diffraction patterns are observed on top of each other. The pattern can be explained using the Fraunhofer case and Kirchhoff's approximate formula, with the electric field being proportional to the Fourier transform of the openings. This is because each point on the opening acts as a source of a wave, and the pattern seen on the screen can be approximated as a plane wave. More detailed information can be found in the Wikipedia article linked in GeneralOJB's post.
  • #1
GeneralOJB
42
0
I'm confused about the single slit diffraction pattern. Why are light and dark patterns? Where is the constructive and destructive interference occurring if there is just one wave?
 
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  • #3
So when doing the double slit experiment, one will see two diffraction patterns on top of each other then?
 
  • #4
The most simple picture about diffraction comes from using the Fraunhofer case (both source and detection screen at infinity) and Kirchhoff's approximate formula. Then the diffraction pattern seen at the screen turns out to be given by the Fourier transform of the openings, i.e., the electric field is proportional to this Fourier transform.

The physical picture behind this is that any point of the opening is the source of a wave, and at the infinitely far away screen you can approximate the spherical wave by a plane wave (Fraunhofer diffraction).

You find the math in great detail at the Wikipedia link in GeneralOJB's posting.
 
  • #5
vanhees71 said:
You find the math in great detail at the Wikipedia link in GeneralOJB's posting.

I think he means my post. :wink:
 

Related to Understanding the Single Slit Diffraction Pattern

1. What is single slit diffraction?

Single slit diffraction is a phenomenon that occurs when a wave passes through a narrow slit. This causes the wave to spread out and create a diffraction pattern on the other side of the slit.

2. How does single slit diffraction differ from double slit diffraction?

Single slit diffraction occurs when a wave passes through a single narrow slit, while double slit diffraction occurs when a wave passes through two closely spaced slits. Single slit diffraction creates a central maximum and a series of smaller maxima and minima, while double slit diffraction creates multiple interference patterns.

3. What factors affect the diffraction pattern in single slit diffraction?

The width of the slit, the wavelength of the wave, and the distance between the slit and the screen all affect the diffraction pattern in single slit diffraction. A wider slit, longer wavelength, and shorter distance will result in a wider central maximum and a smaller diffraction pattern.

4. Why does single slit diffraction occur?

Single slit diffraction occurs due to the wave nature of light. When a wave passes through a narrow slit, the wavefronts diffract or bend around the edges of the slit, creating a diffraction pattern on the other side.

5. What are the applications of single slit diffraction?

Single slit diffraction is used in various applications such as studying the wave nature of light, creating diffraction gratings for spectroscopy, and improving the resolution of optical instruments. It is also used in the production of holograms and in the design of acoustic diffusers for soundproofing.

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