Vaccines: Overwhelming Benefits, Few Risks

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In summary, vaccines have been proven to provide overwhelming benefits in preventing and eradicating diseases, while posing minimal risks. They have played a crucial role in saving countless lives and improving overall public health. The efficacy and safety of vaccines have been extensively researched and monitored, making them a highly recommended and widely used form of disease prevention. Despite some rare and minor side effects, the benefits of vaccines far outweigh any potential risks. It is important for individuals to educate themselves on the facts and benefits of vaccines and make informed decisions for the well-being of themselves and their communities.
  • #176
Lewis Goudy said:
their particular boogieman

I think you mean "bogeyman". "Boogieman" is associated with KC and the Sunshine Band. 😉
 
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  • #178
There is another thread on pf about a promising treatment for Ebola. It is based on a mixture of antibodies that attack the virus. This is not a vaccine as it is curative rather than preventative but I would be curious what the anti vaxer view would be. Vaccines stimulate the immune system via harmless versions of the target virus ( dead/attenuated) This treatment gives the antibodies directly.
 
  • #179
Vanadium 50 said:
I think you mean "bogeyman". "Boogieman" is associated with KC and the Sunshine Band. 😉
Agreed Boogie nights Boogie wonderland = Heat wave / 1970s Earth wind and fire ridiculous clothes. Boo as in two
Bogey at 9 o clock, Bogus = fake, Bogeyman mythical man. The o as in toe.
Americans say bogeyman as in bug, Buggie in the UK is child's pram
 
  • #180
OmCheeto said:
Reminds me of a post of mine from a few years back.

Trying to combine my thoughts from then, with this mornings mathematical ruminations, I see that we'll get back to the rates from 100 years ago, in almost exactly 15 years: July 11, 2034

View attachment 246134

I'm guessing the death rates need to get "personal", as in, "not hear say", to get people to act, responsibly.
When will that happen with the Corona virus? Hard to even know the number of cases.
 
  • #181
WWGD said:
When will that happen with the Corona virus?
To act responsibly? Or when will this get "personal"?
I don't know that there's anything people can do about it, as there's no vaccine.

According to the charts @ wiki, and my always suspicious maths, the entire world will be infected in approximately 35 days: March 2nd, 2020.
At which point we will each have 1 chance in 35 of dying.

Though, I suspect it won't be quite this grim.
It will be interesting though.
I just spent about an hour skimming through the Washington Post's "coronavirus-china-latest-updates" article.
Wow!
 
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  • #182
OmCheeto said:
...At which point we will each have 1 chance in 35 of dying.

Though, I suspect it won't be quite this grim.
Erm. That time with the H1N1 it was 'interesting' to see the difference between countries. Ukraine got it worst as I recall: once the hospitals got overrun with patients the mortality peaked several times over the 'normal' value.
 
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  • #183
Rive said:
Erm. That time with the H1N1 it was 'interesting' to see the difference between countries. Ukraine got it worst as I recall: once the hospitals got overrun with patients the mortality peaked several times over the 'normal' value.
From the graph, it is my guess that some countries didn't bother going to much trouble diagnosing who had it.
While other countries, Italy and France in particular, seemed to be giving out candy for each confirmed case.

2009.H1N1.mortality.rates.by.country.png

data source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2009_flu_pandemic_by_country

ps. It's odd, but I have no recollection of the 2009 pandemic.
 
  • #184
OmCheeto said:
From the graph, it is my guess that some countries didn't bother going to much trouble diagnosing who had it.
No mention there about the amount of actual tests performed and the population per countries: without that it's difficult to take that 'statistics' seriously...

Belarus: 86% dead among the confirmed cases o_O
Guess they made the test only on patients already on intensive care with pneumonia.

OmCheeto said:
ps. It's odd, but I have no recollection of the 2009 pandemic.
It was quite an odd pandemic, actually. I think we got off easy that time.
I had some bouts 'at home' against some anti-vaxers, that's why I have more memories.
 
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  • #185
Rive said:
No mention there about the amount of actual tests performed and the population per countries: without that it's difficult to take that 'statistics' seriously...

Belarus: 86% dead among the confirmed cases o_O
Guess they made the test only on patients already on intensive care with pneumonia.It was quite an odd pandemic, actually. I think we got off easy that time.
I had some bouts 'at home' against some anti-vaxers, that's why I have more memories.
If one counts the number of deaths compared to the entire population, the oddballs get lost in the data.

2009.H1N1.rate.for.population.png


It looks like Columbia was in the middle with 5.3 deaths per million population. That's about 1 in 200,000. That seems like a very low rate to me. It's no wonder I don't remember it.
 
  • #186
With Venezuela in the condition its in now, seems a plague would have free rein there, with people weakened by hunger and the extreme shortage of most basic medicines. Maybe similar for others like NK.
 
  • #188
Regardless of who gets infected the odds of dying remain constant at 100%
 
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  • #189
BWV said:
Regardless of who gets infected the odds of dying remain constant at 100%
You mean for the Corona virus? And for now?
 
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  • #190
WWGD said:
You mean for the Corona virus? And for now?
Birth is a 100% fatal condition.
 
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  • #191
Life is a terminal disease.
 
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  • #192
BillTre said:
Life is a terminal disease.
##a.a.##
 
  • #193
fresh_42 said:
##a.a.##
Almost Always?
 
  • #194
WWGD said:
Almost Always?
Well, there are rumors ...
 
  • #195
Bah, I keep falling for the same.
 
  • #196
IIRC, SARS' lethal cytokine storm was thwarted by canny Canadian medics who treated it with steroids per 'normal' pneumonia. (*)

But, making a zillion doses ASAP then delivering them to affected areas is non-trivial...

*) Speaking of 'normal' threats, you have had your 'seasonal' 'flu vaccination and your 'decadal' pneumonia equivalent ? Be real-silly to dodge the nasty nCV, but succumb to something so easily prevented or mitigated.

Worst case, if your hospital goes 'Code Black', those vaccinations may earn you potentially life-saving triage points, unto 'Is Worth Treating'...
 
  • #197
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  • #198
Bandersnatch said:
Luckily, its basic reproduction number has been declining worldwide.
Unfortunately, the decrease is not equally weighted between the developed and non-developed countries. Ethiopia and Nigeria alone will be adding a total of some 340 million people by 2050 ; 120 and 220 million respective ly, per CIA's world factbook.
 
  • #199
@WWGD that's total change in population (in this analogy ~total number of infected individuals). Their fertility rate drop is among the sharpest.
 
  • #200
Bandersnatch said:
@WWGD that's total change in population (in this analogy ~total number of infected individuals). Their fertility rate drop is among the sharpest.
By fertility rate you mean the average number of children?
 
  • #201
Yes. Per a woman's lifetime, to be precise.
 
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  • #202
Bandersnatch said:
Yes. Per a woman's lifetime, to be precise.
Ok. I remember at some point Kenya had a growth rate of around 4.3% growth rate, doubling in less than 17 yrs. Crazy. I think Uganda's is similarly high even now.
 

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