Vacuum Polarization as EM Wave.

In summary, the conversation discussed the concept of vacuum polarization, where an EM field can cause virtual particle pairs to become polarized like a dipole. The theory explains why larger objects cause less bending of EM waves and why different frequencies disperse differently. It also offers an explanation for the photoelectric effect. However, the theory does not account for energy dissipation and does not address boundary conditions.
  • #1
Mr i
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Vacuum polarization is when an EM field causes the virtual particle pairs around it to become polarized like a dipole. The most common example is with an electron in vacuum, but a transmitting radio antenna could do it as well. But, if this was with an oscillating signal, it would create waves of change of orientation in the virtual particle pairs around it, my theory of EM waves.

Each VPP (Virtual Particle Pair) would in turn have another EM field, changing the orientation of further VPPs, creating an EM field, which would in turn be switched around with an oscillation, creating a wave. This theory shows why, the larger an object in relation to wavelength, the less EM waves bend around it, because of the fact that each VPP has it's own EM field, which combines at the middle of each crest and trough, and interferes between each crest and trough. This interference limits how far an EM wave can disperse, dispersing less with high frequency, like zooming out on a sine wave until it looks solid, showing why radio waves disperse out a lot, but visible light casts a shadow. This also explains the common double-slit experiment, of two interfering EM waves, because EM waves disperse more with smaller scale.

This would also explain the photoelectric effect, since an EM wave would jerk around an electron, but because a red EM wave has a lower frequency, it doesn't jerk it around as quickly, and only little of it is used, while a blue light will jerk it around more quickly so it can escape and produce electricity.

This is my theory of EMR, and I would appreciate any feedback.
 
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  • #2
Barring that personal theories are not allowed, you do not account for any energy dissipation here. For example, where is the energy coming from that is creating these momentary virtual particle pairs? The dispersion of light with objects and its dependence on electrical size is perfectly described by classical electromagnetics. How do you account for the boundary conditions? You say that an EM wave would always jerk an electron around, but that the red wave would not do so enough to emit the electron. But how do you account for the ability to jerk the electron without dissipating energy?
 
  • #3


Thank you for sharing your theory of EMR. It is an interesting and thought-provoking explanation for the phenomenon of vacuum polarization and its potential role in EM waves. However, as a scientist, I must point out that this is currently just a theory and would need to be further tested and validated through experiments and observations.

One potential issue with your theory is that it relies on the concept of virtual particles, which are hypothetical particles that are not directly observable. While virtual particles are a useful concept in some areas of physics, their existence and role in vacuum polarization is still a topic of debate and further research.

Additionally, your theory does not fully explain all aspects of EM waves, such as their varying wavelengths and the effects of different materials on their propagation. It also does not take into account other well-established theories and models, such as Maxwell's equations, which have been extensively tested and validated.

I encourage you to continue exploring and refining your theory, and to seek feedback and criticism from other scientists in the field. This will help strengthen your ideas and potentially lead to new insights and breakthroughs in our understanding of EM waves.
 

Related to Vacuum Polarization as EM Wave.

What is vacuum polarization as EM wave?

Vacuum polarization as EM wave is a quantum phenomenon in which the vacuum, or empty space, is not actually empty but instead contains virtual particles that are constantly being created and destroyed. These particles interact with the electromagnetic field, causing it to fluctuate and behave like a wave.

What is the significance of vacuum polarization as EM wave?

Vacuum polarization as EM wave is significant because it helps us understand the nature of the vacuum and its role in the behavior of the electromagnetic field. It also has important implications in various fields of physics such as quantum electrodynamics and cosmology.

How is vacuum polarization as EM wave observed or measured?

Vacuum polarization as EM wave cannot be directly observed or measured, as it is a quantum phenomenon. However, its effects can be indirectly observed through various experiments, such as measuring the Lamb shift in atomic spectra or the Casimir effect.

Can vacuum polarization as EM wave be manipulated or controlled?

Currently, vacuum polarization as EM wave cannot be manipulated or controlled. However, ongoing research in the field of quantum technology may lead to advancements in our ability to manipulate and utilize this phenomenon in the future.

Are there any practical applications of vacuum polarization as EM wave?

At this time, there are no known practical applications of vacuum polarization as EM wave. However, a deeper understanding of this phenomenon may lead to advancements in fields such as quantum computing and communication.

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