Velocity of block as it hits a table sliding down a ramp?

In summary: So we can plug these values into the equation to find the final velocity (vf):vf = √(2(0.2)(9.8)(0.85)) = 1.96 m/sIn summary, to find the velocity of the block as it hits the table, we first drew a free-body diagram and used the equation for the net force in the x-direction to relate the weight force, friction force, and acceleration. We then used the relationship between the normal force and weight force to substitute for the normal force in our equation. After solving for the acceleration, we used a kinematic equation to find the final velocity of the block, which was 1.96 m/s.
  • #1
fishfish
20
0

Homework Statement



A block of steel is placed 120cm from the end of a sheet of metal. The sheet is raised just until the block begins to slide, which occurs when the block as 35cm above the surface of the table. the block is allowed to slide freely down the sheet until it slides onto the table. If the coefficient of friction is 0.20, what is the velocity of the block as it hits the table?

Homework Equations



Fxnet= Fg - Ff

Fynet= Fn + Fg = 0
Fn=Fg
Fn=mgcosθ

The Attempt at a Solution



Okay so I know that the angle would be 17 using trig.. But I don't exactly know how the masses cancel out here since we aren't given a mass. I know I have to find the acceleration of the block, and by finding that, I can find the final velocity using one of the five sisters. What I started out with was..

Fxnet = Fg + Ff
= mgsinθ + (Mu x Fn)
= mgsinθ + (Mu x mgcosθ)
= sin θ + (mu x cosθ) <--The thing is I'm not sure if I can do this or not..
=sin 17 + (0.2)(cos17)
= 0.1 N

then I don't know what to do after this..
 
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  • #2


Thank you for your question. It seems like you are on the right track with your attempt at a solution. Let's go through the steps together:

1. First, let's draw a free-body diagram for the block on the sheet. We have the weight force (Fg) acting downwards, and the normal force (Fn) acting perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. We also have the friction force (Ff) acting parallel to the surface of the sheet, in the opposite direction of motion.

2. Next, let's write out the equation for the net force in the x-direction. We know that the block is not moving in the x-direction, so the net force must be equal to zero. This means that Fxnet = 0.

3. Now, let's plug in the values that we know. The weight force (Fg) is equal to the mass of the block (m) times the acceleration due to gravity (g). We can also write the friction force (Ff) as the coefficient of friction (μ) times the normal force (Fn). Since the block is not moving in the x-direction, we can write this equation as:

Fxnet = Fg + Ff = 0

mg - μFn = 0

4. We also know that the normal force (Fn) is equal to the weight force (Fg) times the cosine of the angle (θ). This is because the normal force is the component of the weight force that acts perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. So we can write:

Fn = Fg cosθ = mgcosθ

5. Now we can substitute this expression for Fn into our equation for Fxnet:

mg - μ(mgcosθ) = 0

6. We can solve for the acceleration (a) by dividing both sides by the mass (m):

a = g - μgcosθ

7. We can now use this acceleration to find the final velocity (vf) using the kinematic equation:

vf^2 = vi^2 + 2ad

Since the block starts from rest (vi = 0), we can simplify this equation to:

vf = √(2ad)

8. We know the distance (d) that the block travels, which is 120cm - 35cm = 85cm. We also know the acceleration (a) that we calculated in step 6.
 
  • #3




Firstly, it is important to clarify the problem statement. Is the block sliding down a ramp or a sheet of metal? Based on the given information, it seems like the block is sliding down a ramp, as the sheet is only used to lift the block to the starting position.

Assuming that the block is sliding down a ramp, we can use the given information to find the acceleration of the block. The block will experience two forces along the ramp: its weight (Fg) and the frictional force (Ff). We can set up the following equation:

Fxnet = Fg - Ff = ma

Where m is the mass of the block and a is the acceleration. We can substitute in the known values:

Fxnet = mgsinθ - μmgcosθ = ma

We can rearrange this equation to solve for the acceleration:

a = g(sinθ - μcosθ)

Substituting in the given values, we get:

a = (9.8 m/s^2)(sin 17° - 0.2 cos 17°) = 1.6 m/s^2

Now, we can use one of the five sisters (kinematic equations) to find the final velocity of the block as it hits the table. Since the block starts from rest, we can use the equation:

vf^2 = vi^2 + 2ad

Where vf is the final velocity, vi is the initial velocity (which is 0 in this case), a is the acceleration, and d is the distance traveled (which is the length of the ramp, 120cm). Substituting in the known values, we get:

vf^2 = 0 + 2(1.6 m/s^2)(1.2 m) = 3.84 m^2/s^2

Taking the square root of both sides, we get the final velocity of the block as it hits the table:

vf = √(3.84) = 1.96 m/s

Therefore, the velocity of the block as it hits the table is 1.96 m/s. It is important to note that this is the magnitude of the velocity, as the direction of the block's motion would depend on the angle of the ramp.
 

Related to Velocity of block as it hits a table sliding down a ramp?

1. What is the velocity of the block as it hits the table?

The velocity of the block as it hits the table is dependent on several factors including the height and angle of the ramp, friction, and the mass of the block. It can be calculated using the formula v = √(2gh), where v is the velocity, g is the acceleration due to gravity (9.8 m/s²), and h is the height of the ramp.

2. How does the angle of the ramp affect the velocity of the block?

The angle of the ramp affects the velocity of the block by changing the height from which the block is released. A steeper angle will result in a higher velocity as the block will have a longer distance to accelerate. However, friction may also play a role in reducing the velocity.

3. Does friction affect the velocity of the block?

Yes, friction can affect the velocity of the block as it slides down the ramp. Friction acts in the opposite direction of motion and can decrease the velocity of the block. The amount of friction depends on the materials of the block and surface of the ramp.

4. Is the mass of the block a factor in its velocity?

Yes, the mass of the block is a factor in its velocity. According to Newton's second law of motion, the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the force applied and inversely proportional to its mass. Therefore, a larger mass will result in a slower acceleration and lower velocity.

5. Can the velocity of the block be calculated using other formulas?

Yes, there are other formulas that can be used to calculate the velocity of the block as it slides down the ramp. These include the energy conservation formula, v = √(2gh - 2μkcosθ), where μ is the coefficient of friction, k is the spring constant, and θ is the angle of the ramp. Additionally, the work-energy theorem, v = √(2gh + 2μkcosθ), can also be used to calculate the velocity of the block.

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