Violent Flash Mobs organized through social media

  1. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

  2. jcsd
  3. Greg Bernhardt

    Staff: Admin

    Re: Riots on the streets of London

    Just want to make a quick comment that in my city of Milwaukee, we've been having problems with youths organizing violent mobs via social media. At our 4th of July fireworks we had a mob destroy a 7-11 and then proceed to beat up 20-30 firework watchers. Also just last week we had a mob of 200 youths causing mayhem at our state fair which sent 30 to the hospital. It's a huge issue here. Social media is rearing it's ugly head.
     
  4. dlgoff

    dlgoff 3,123
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    2014 Award

    Re: Riots on the streets of London

    WTF. At least in the '70s there was a reason to protest. What can we do to stop this sort of thing? It's giving the internet a bad name.
     
  5. Greg Bernhardt

    Staff: Admin

    Re: Riots on the streets of London

    It's becoming a widespread problem. Philly now has problems too.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-14466369
     
  6. dlgoff

    dlgoff 3,123
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    Re: Riots on the streets of London

    I saw this on TV this morning here. This bothers me, but if that's what it takes, okay?

     
  7. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

  8. jtbell

    Staff: Mentor

    Don't we already have laws against inciting violence and organizing criminal activity in general?
     
  9. turbo

    turbo 7,366
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    Tricky question. The right to assemble and associate freely is something that the ACLU will defend all the way to the SC, especially since banning flash mobs carries an assumption of guilt - that the mob will be violent, and there is prior intent of committing violence. As I said, tricky.
     
  10. dlgoff

    dlgoff 3,123
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  11. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    Is there something that needs to be changed if social media is concerned?

    But as jt stated how can
    "laws against inciting violence and organizing criminal activity in general", suddenly be unconstitutional? Is it specifically including the method being used that they oppose? Because if they are tweeting to meet and do illegal activities, that's not protected AFAIK.

    I don't quite get what the legal issue is.

    Don, can you clarify, do you think the ACLU is right or wrong?
     
  12. dlgoff

    dlgoff 3,123
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    This time I think they are wrong as bodily harm shouldn't be tolerated. But in other times, the ACLU do have some good points. IMO anyway.
     
  13. turbo

    turbo 7,366
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    When a mob of sports nuts hits the streets after a particularly big loss (or win!) there can often be violence. We've seen it happen too many times in the US. The UK is well-known for soccer-related violence, too.

    Flash mobs can occur for a number of reasons, including premieres, street performance by artists, etc. It is not cut-and-dried if there was intent for this crowd to turn violent. Here's a link to a multi-event a little over a week ago that turned violent.

    http://abclocal.go.com/kabc/story?section=news/local/los_angeles&id=8276337
     
  14. What's the difference between using social media or having a list of phone numbers of people who are into "rioting"?

    I take issue with the idea that social media "fuels" the behaviour. It's just a means.
     
  15. The good thing about it is that everything is documented. :) Easier to get to the perps.
     
  16. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    But I'm referring to social media to specifically commit crimes and/or violence, not accidental mobs.

    http://www.boston.com/news/nation/a..._mobsters_crowd_size_a_tempting_cover/?page=2
     
  17. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    It's that they can *instantly* send the message to thousands of people, they can *instantly* control the movement of the entire crowd as the criminal activity occurs in order to elude police. They can *instantly* name specific targets and call for backup. This is making it almost impossible for police to be effective. *That's the difference*.
     
  18. mheslep

    mheslep 3,492
    Gold Member

    Mob violence is the fundamental issue here and hence nothing new; the technology component incidental it seems to me. Thus the solution is also traditional.
    http://video.foxnews.com/v/video-embed.html?video_id=1029359724001

    That's unfortunate but, when the situation escalates beyond the control of traditional police power, required. Its a simple choice. Either choose uncontrolled mob violence which if unchecked will escalate or choose police controlled violence.

    An absent police response, the violence in London should be met with some of the same self defense used in the '92 LA riots.[​IMG]
     
  19. Evo

    Staff: Mentor

    The thing mheslep, the crowds can form, commit crimes, and be gone before police arrive. That's what makes this sort of thing so hard to control.

    Did you read the articles? Did you read mob crime attacks on stores finished in 5 minutes?
     
  20. mheslep

    mheslep 3,492
    Gold Member

    Yes I get the point of the word 'flash'. Watch the video especially at 4:20 or so with the psychologist and Sliwa. Not everyone gets away, there are usually a handful that are caught and treated lightly, and despite the large numbers as always there are hard core criminal leaders of the pack. Leadership means it's also possible given the use of technology to preempt the mob with an informer or two.
     
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