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We Want To Study Physics

  1. Mar 16, 2007 #1

    ZapperZ

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    If you ever forget, or take for granted, your ability and freedom to study stuff like physics, just think of those who are denied access to them. Such a case is happening in Nepal. It got so bad that students were protesting and chanting that they want to study physics!

    Zz.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 16, 2007 #2

    G01

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    Wow.... It makes you think...... Why does the government of Nepal not allow the students to take physics? Or is it just not offered by the education system?
     
  4. Mar 16, 2007 #3

    robphy

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    That might make a nice PF-blog entry.

    If we open a new university there, it could be the *top* university in the world. :rofl:
     
  5. Mar 16, 2007 #4

    G01

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    :rofl: This shouldn't be as funny as it is!:rolleyes:
     
  6. Mar 16, 2007 #5
    As anything else in life, you may take it seriously and either cry, or act, or you may laugh, and either stay there or act :smile:
     
  7. Mar 16, 2007 #6
    You Physics people are a wild bunch!
     
  8. Mar 16, 2007 #7

    JasonRox

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    And people here are chanting the opposite. :cry:
     
  9. Mar 16, 2007 #8

    ZapperZ

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    From what I understand, it is not that they do not allow people to study physics, it is just that there is only an extremely small number that are allowed, maybe due to the very limited resources.

    But JasonRox made a very important contrasting point. Many in the Western world are almost to the point of bribing students to take up physics. High school teachers sometime even resort to using themselves as target practice or getting soaked to get students to be interested in physics. We go to great lengths to get students interested in physics. Yet, here you have people protesting so that they can be allowed to study physics.

    It is times like this that you just shake your head at the injustice of the world. It is just isn't fair.

    Zz.
     
  10. Mar 16, 2007 #9

    Moonbear

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    Maybe it's just the allure of what is forbidden. Maybe we should tell all the students that physics is just too "grown up" for them, and it might teach them things that would give them ideas about rebelling against authority, so we just can't allow it anymore. They'd be signing up in droves! :biggrin:
     
  11. Mar 16, 2007 #10
    I dont think this is true. No one really cares about physics in the US, thats the problem. Schools care about their sports program, and students care about becoming doctors or lawyers to become rich.

    If we cared so much about physics every physics student would get a full ride to complete their degree with jobs waiting for them like the 60's.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2007
  12. Mar 16, 2007 #11

    ZapperZ

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    Er... isn't that what I was trying to point out?

    It is a problem in MANY parts of the Western World. In the UK, for example, the physics dept at Reading University will be closed down at the end of the academic year. The enrollment in physics at the A-level has dropped over the years. Several other European countries are having the same issues.

    Compare that to China, Japan, and South Korea.

    Zz.
     
  13. Mar 16, 2007 #12

    JasonRox

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    All this for projectile motion!? Wow, I couldn't imagine what it would take to get a student to go into further physics.

    For projectile motion, I was satisfied with simply thinking about throwing a ball in the air.
     
  14. Mar 16, 2007 #13

    Moonbear

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    Yeah, imagine that. Kids nowadays. :rolleyes:

    Actually, we talked about things like shooting cannonballs, which seemed like more fun than throwing a baseball. :biggrin:
     
  15. Mar 16, 2007 #14
    Oh, im sorry. I misread what you wrote. Yes, I see what you mean now.
     
  16. Mar 16, 2007 #15

    robphy

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    I personally think that we need to be talking more about MODERN PHYSICS...and sooner! Generally speaking, we spend the two semesters allocated to us talking about "old" physics, usually presented in a pseudo-historical way. If we're lucky, a few stick around for a third semester to see the MODERN stuff, with the rest dispersed to focus on something else.

    Akin to the new "Physics First" movement, maybe we also need a "Modern Physics first" movement. Some textbooks along these lines:
    Modern Introductory Physics (Holbrow et al)
    http://www.amazon.com/Modern-Introductory-Physics-Undergraduate-Contemporary/dp/038798576X
    Matter & Interactions (Chabay and Sherwood)
    http://www4.ncsu.edu/~rwchabay/mi/


    In addition, maybe we need to publicize stories like the recent Intel Science Talent Search winner https://www.physicsforums.com/blog/2007/03/15/intel-science-talent-search-2007-winners/ for a physics project.
     
  17. Mar 16, 2007 #16
    You can talk about shooting laser beams from the Death Star to blow up planet Alderaan, it doesn't make it any less boring.

    In my physics class we build catapults and calculate the information necessary to send a cantaloupe into a target. That's a lot more exciting than a word problem asking to find the same information. Plus, it shows that everything just learned is in fact accurate, and not a bunch of bull made up to make it easy for students to plug-n-chug.

    Yes!
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2007
  18. Mar 16, 2007 #17
    Wow this is sad. They actually had riot controll come in and stop them with clubs.

    I remembe last year half my class was saying 'when will I ever need physics?' and they all hated it. Its a sad comparison. One day if i'm ever an accomplished person I'll make a not to myself to go help the science programs in nepal
     
  19. Mar 16, 2007 #18

    Moonbear

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    Except that wouldn't be projectile motion. :wink: And that's the point...smashing cantaloupes might get the class to applaud and have fun, but if they still aren't taught the physics, it does no good.

    Then again, I grew up in a generation that still knew how to use their imaginations. We didn't have to have a ball to play baseball, so could imagine projectile motion without someone having to lob melons across a field. Granted, we had a lot of disputes over whether the batter hit a home run (the batter's version) or a foul (the pitcher's version). Oh, and yeah, we had to walk uphill both ways in the snow to get to school too. :tongue:
     
  20. Mar 16, 2007 #19
    I think a large part of the problem is a lack of qualified teachers and a system that does not work. I have friends that came from countries in africa that did the first two years of our college level work in their high school. And thats standard over there, not a some stupid AP -BS. They learn french, english, and whatever their local language is. Im sorry to say, but the kids in high school here are just plain ole-stupid. Its that simple, and I was one of them thanks to the system. These are kids who dont have fancy TI-83 calculators.

    High school was good for learning about US history, and thats about it. I didnt care for math, science, physics or english in high school. Sad..4 years of my life wasted.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2007
  21. Mar 16, 2007 #20
    To be fair, I'm not going to learn Physics either way when our lessons are basically:
    "Here is a nice, fancy equation to plug-n-chug with. These are what the variables stand for. Don't ask me how this equation came about, because I'm not going to tell you and treat you like a simpleton for not knowing. Now do this worksheet where every problem is the exact same thing with the numbers changed."

    I'm going to agree 100% with this.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2007
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