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What is cold for you?

  1. Nov 7, 2014 #1
    For me 76°F is cold and at 69°F I begin to shiver. I'm used to temperatures ≥ 90°F almost every day. In fact my room has been lately getting at 94°F at night while 86°F at the outside of the house (at night). Therefore, I'm very sensitive when it comes to drops in temperature.

    Anyway, what about you? What is cold for you and when do you begin to shiver?
     
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  3. Nov 7, 2014 #2

    Danger

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    I'm going to have to use conversions here—we're metric. I keep my home thermostat at 85°F, but it's in an area of the house where heat accumulates. The parts of the house where I spend my time are generally around 72°. All that I wear in that environment is sweat pants and slippers. The window beside my couch/bed is quite leaky, so I use a blanket for sleeping in winter.
    Outside, anything above 50° is jeans and a T-shirt sitting on the lawn with beer weather. I'm comfortable going outside in a T-shirt at around 35°—50°, but not just sitting around. If I have to walk anywhere, it's easiest for me to breath between 32° and -5°, but I have to wear a coat. Below that, it's too painful to breathe without a scarf, but that interferes with my oxygen supply.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2014
  4. Nov 7, 2014 #3

    Evo

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    I break out in painful swollen welts and start swelling up if the temperature hits 75F. Above that I stop perspiring and my body temp and blood pressure plummet, becoming serious. I keep my house at 65F year round and keep a large fan blowing on me. Outside temps 5-10F are cold, but even higher temps where the windchill reaches these lower temps feel cold. At night in the winter, I open my bedroom window with outside temps below 20F. Last year a plant I had in front of the window died, it froze. :( inside my bedroom. I make sure the rooms with water pipes are kept above freezing.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2014
  5. Nov 7, 2014 #4

    DaveC426913

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    I'm at a similar latitude to Danger. Anything above 50F is T-shirt weather.

    This past winter we had a bit of a cold snap where it reached -20F.
     
  6. Nov 7, 2014 #5

    lisab

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    I prefer cooler temps. Inside, not much above 20 or 21 C (68 or 70 F). Outside...well I think I'm sensitive to humidity. Where I live now, it's rainy/misty/foggy often in the winter. Anything below 4 C (40 F) feels pretty cold - being wet and cold is miserable.

    But I used to live in Fairbanks, Alaska. It's an Arctic climate, and it was extremely dry there. Temps around -20 C (-4 F) were routine in winter, but it wasn't unbearable.

    Two observations: in very cold climates, people keep their houses unreasonably warm, and holy moly static electric shocks are brutal!
     
  7. Nov 8, 2014 #6
    263-273K is alright, 243-253K winters are a bane.
     
  8. Nov 8, 2014 #7
    Anything below a dry 75F is where I start regarding it as a bit too cool.

    Of course, heat comfort and discomfort are radically affected by the humidity. I lived in Minneapolis for 8 years. The winters are much too cold and the summers are much too humid (not too hot, too humid)
     
  9. Nov 8, 2014 #8

    wukunlin

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    I find it quite interesting that when I lived in Auckland, NZ, I start to feel hot at around 17C, but now I live in Sydney AU, I still feel a bit cold at 25C.
     
  10. Nov 8, 2014 #9
    Maybe that we get older each day explains why.
     
  11. Nov 8, 2014 #10

    Danger

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    That's a pretty valid point. Blood density changes, muscular weakness in the cardio-pulminary system, arthritis... they all make cold & humidity terrible enemies.
     
  12. Nov 8, 2014 #11

    Mark44

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    One place I lived for about a year while I was in college was a fisheman's shack with gaps around the windows and the window frame. To keep the place warm I bought a used space heater. One night, with the space heater going, it got cold enough in my room that a glass of water beside my bed froze solid. That's in no way an exaggeration.

    Another place I shared with a good friend had one room that was heated and one that wasn't. In my (unheated) room you could see stars at night through a narrow gap between the wall and the ceiling. Some friends we had over tracked some snow into my room - the snow lay there unmelted for two days.

    BTW, both places I'm describing were free...

    I've noticed that as well. My ex-inlaws (in the "banana belt" of Montana, near Missoula) kept their house so warm that I always brought along a pair of shorts to wear. At one time the inside/outside temperature difference was so great that a glass pane in their front door cracked.

    The coldest temps I have experienced were -39F in Lolo, Montana, per the time and temp sign on a nearby bank. During the day it would warm up into the -20s (F). On a lark one day I decided to walk around the outside of the house, barefoot, wearing shorts and no shirt, in about 6" of snow. Some people probably wouldn't do thato0)
     
  13. Nov 8, 2014 #12
    Wow. You all seem to be able to handle cold very well. Danger and Dave can be on T-shirts in the range of 50°F while Evo can sleep with surrounding temps approximating 20°F.

    Amazed, I'm simply amazed. To think the lowest I've ever been is 62F (and I thought I would freeze). For you all that temperature must be a breeze.

    PS. My condolences to Evo's plant.:nb)
     
  14. Nov 8, 2014 #13

    Ryan_m_b

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    Below 10C the cold starts to bother me. If I'm in my coat, hat and gloves though anything down to 0 is ok though it's obviously not comfortable.
     
  15. Nov 8, 2014 #14

    dlgoff

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    I learned a little about Wisconsin's winter temperatures/wind chills from Greg when we were at the Science Festival. I love the man but wouldn't want to live with him. :(

    blizzards.gif
     
  16. Nov 8, 2014 #15

    Danger

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    Don't worry about it; she kills one about every 10 minutes. You get used to it pretty quickly.
    Our coldest winter (going by on-site thermometers and anemometers since it was out on a farm) hit -55°F with the wind-chill factor at -75°. We don't go outside on days like that.
     
  17. Nov 8, 2014 #16

    Simon Bridge

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    Cold, for me, is when she gives you her number but never picks up.
     
  18. Nov 8, 2014 #17

    Astronuc

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    I'm comfortable in shorts, T-shirt and bare feet at ~ 0°C, and even lower if the air is try.

    Coldness depends on the heat transfer coefficient and ambient temperature.
     
  19. Nov 8, 2014 #18

    Danger

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    You should relink your picture of you playing Tarzan in the snow to this thread. :D
     
  20. Nov 9, 2014 #19

    Matterwave

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    In Fahrenheit I consider 70 to be the ideal temperature 65 starts getting cool, and probably 50 is cold. In Celsius, I consider 21 to be ideal, 18 starts getting cool, and 12 is cold.

    ...does that add up at all...
     
  21. Nov 9, 2014 #20

    Danger

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    Myeah... apples and oranges. It all ends up as fruit salad anyhow...
     
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