What Is the Resistance of Each Resistor in a Modified Cube Circuit?

In summary, to solve this problem, you can redraw the schematic in a 2D form and use mesh analysis or KCL/KVL to calculate the resistance of each resistor. It is also helpful to imagine the wires as infinitely stretchy and bendable entities to find the six loops in the circuit. By rearranging the circuit's shape, you can make it easier to evaluate without changing the outcome.
  • #1
Dough
19
0
Imagine a cube where all sides have a resistor, now remove one resistor from it and replace it with an ohmmeter, the ohmmeter reads 100ohms, calculate the resistance of each resistor. By the way each resistor is the same value.

How do you go about doign this question?
 
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  • #2
Questions like this only have one purpose: to confuse you. There is a very simple, sure-fire way of solving problems like this, and that is to re-draw the schematic in a way that makes sense. "Unwrap" the cube and draw it as a 2d schematic, and you will see that it's a trivial problem that can be solved with mesh analysis or KCL/KVL.

Edit: don't be afraid to rearrange the circuit's shape a bit, too, to make it easier to evaluate. As long as you keep the connections at the same points, the outcome will be identical.
 
  • #3
Dough said:
Imagine a cube where all sides have a resistor, now remove one resistor from it and replace it with an ohmmeter, the ohmmeter reads 100ohms, calculate the resistance of each resistor. By the way each resistor is the same value.

How do you go about doign this question?
Can you give me an image of your cude because i nedd an illutration to answer this question
 
  • #4
I want an image of your cube if it's possible
 
  • #5
Nevek said:
I want an image of your cube if it's possible

OK here you go. It even has the revised version for flatlanders :smile:
 

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  • #6
There's a better way to draw a flat "resistor cube" that doesn't involve overlapping any wires.

http://img149.echo.cx/img149/5425/resistor8pc.gif

In these circuit diagram problems it always helps me to imagine the wires as these infinitely stretchy/bendable entities that just have to stay connected. Bend them around in my head a bit, then see what I can come up with.
 
  • #7
dfollett76 said:
There's a better way to draw a flat "resistor cube" that doesn't involve overlapping any wires.

http://img149.echo.cx/img149/5425/resistor8pc.gif

In these circuit diagram problems it always helps me to imagine the wires as these infinitely stretchy/bendable entities that just have to stay connected. Bend them around in my head a bit, then see what I can come up with.

I think you are right. It just looks too 3D that way for my tastes :smile: , like peering into the cube through the face. I actually prefer the 3D look. The important thing is that no matter how you draw it, you have to see the six loops and deal with them.
 

Related to What Is the Resistance of Each Resistor in a Modified Cube Circuit?

1. What is a resistor cube?

A resistor cube is a three-dimensional electronic component that contains multiple resistors in one compact unit. It is typically made up of several layers of resistors stacked on top of each other, connected by metal contacts.

2. How does a resistor cube work?

A resistor cube works by limiting the flow of electric current in a circuit. It does this by converting electrical energy into heat energy, which dissipates through its resistive layers. This resistance is measured in ohms and can be adjusted by changing the size and material of the resistors within the cube.

3. What are the advantages of using a resistor cube?

There are several advantages to using a resistor cube in electronic circuits. One is its compact size, which saves space and simplifies circuit design. It also allows for precise resistance values, as the resistors are manufactured with high precision. Additionally, resistor cubes have a high power handling capacity and can handle high temperatures without damage.

4. How do you choose the right resistor cube for a circuit?

When choosing a resistor cube, it is important to consider the required resistance value, power handling capacity, and physical size. You should also take into account the material and tolerance of the resistors within the cube, as well as the specific environmental conditions the cube will be subjected to. It is best to consult with a professional or refer to a datasheet for the specific requirements of your circuit.

5. Are there any limitations to using a resistor cube?

While resistor cubes have many advantages, they do have some limitations. One limitation is that they can only provide a fixed resistance value, so they are not suitable for circuits that require variable resistance. They also have a limited power handling capacity and may not be suitable for high-power applications. Additionally, resistor cubes can be more expensive than individual resistors, so cost may be a consideration in certain applications.

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