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What is This Component?

  1. Dec 3, 2015 #1
    What is this component in the middle with the two broken connections? It is on an instrument for measuring extensional viscosity that is not working. It looks like a power amp and a wire wound resistor on the same board got real hot. Don't know if there is any relationship to the two broken connections pictured.
     

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  3. Dec 3, 2015 #2

    phinds

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    It's a fuse chip with four fuses, two of which have blown
     
  4. Dec 3, 2015 #3
    Thank you very much! However, I am having a heck of a time finding similar parts on the internets. Do you have any suggestions on where to find it or how to search for it?

    Regards,
    Lucas
     
  5. Dec 3, 2015 #4

    Daz

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  6. Dec 3, 2015 #5

    phinds

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    Really? What did you try? Googling for "8-pin fuse chips" got a TON of hits
     
  7. Dec 3, 2015 #6

    anorlunda

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    In an event, the fuses blew for a reason. If you replace them before fixing the cause, the new fuses will probably blow also.
     
  8. Dec 3, 2015 #7
  9. Dec 3, 2015 #8
    What Daz posted looked like an exact match. If it was a fuse, would the top blow off like that?
     
  10. Dec 3, 2015 #9

    Daz

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    A Dil jumper was used as a low-cost alternative for a DIP switch. They were used for configuration settings that aren't expected to change after manufacture. You plug (or solder) the thing in and then punch or snip the straps as required.
     
  11. Dec 3, 2015 #10
    very doubtful that it is a fuse.. it would be hard to make accurate current control in that structure
    I believe that it t is a programable ( well one time) jumper block.
    A cheaper version of a DIP switch
     
  12. Dec 3, 2015 #11

    phinds

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    I assumed that it was topless so the fuses could be replaced, but it could be, as others have suggested, a jumper chip. If it IS a jumper chip then something REALLY drew too much current.


    EDIT: yeah, now that I look, I don't see any "topless" fuse chips so I guess it must be a jumper chip that really got overloaded.
     
  13. Dec 3, 2015 #12

    CWatters

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    Is it possible those two jumpers were cut at the factory when it was made?
     
  14. Dec 3, 2015 #13

    CWatters

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    I would try tracing the circuit in that area. How thick are the PCB traces that connect to the jumpers?
     
  15. Dec 3, 2015 #14
    The plastic looks melted under the two broken links, so that suggests probably not.
     
  16. Dec 3, 2015 #15

    anorlunda

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    Why would jumpers narrow down to a thin bottleneck shape like that? If I was going to make a fuse out of foil, a shape like that would be perfect. You could fine tune the amp rating of the fuse by how narrow the bottleneck is.
     
  17. Dec 3, 2015 #16

    Averagesupernova

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    My guess is that it is something that is one time programmable.
     
  18. Dec 3, 2015 #17

    davenn

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    no, specific jumpers are cut to provide a certain function
    and when used in this fashion, jumpers can always be rejoined and other combinations cut

    I have used this method often in PLL radio systems where I want to set the n=counter number to give the correct frequency

    there are many other uses :smile:

    Dave
     
  19. Dec 3, 2015 #18

    phinds

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    Oh, it looked to me like a blown fuse. Guess you're right, though.
     
  20. Dec 3, 2015 #19

    davenn

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    a trap for young players :wink::-p ( tease, tease knowing you are my senior )
     
  21. Dec 3, 2015 #20

    phinds

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    What? I can't be more than 30 or 40 years older than you :smile:
     
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