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Physics What jobs can a Physicist do?

  1. Nov 15, 2017 #61

    symbolipoint

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    I might have misunderstood post #57. So the 61 year-old did not necessarily have trouble finding a job (Obviously, since worked for NASA).
     
  2. Nov 15, 2017 #62
    No, he came back in Italy and he find no job.
     
  3. Nov 15, 2017 #63

    symbolipoint

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    As you explained in another post, the unemployment rate is very high there. No wonder he found no job after returning. He may also be troubled with the condition of being overqualified, even though he still wants and needs employment, regardless of any extra qualifications he has.
     
  4. Nov 15, 2017 #64
    No, that person's academic credentials are not sufficient by themselves to land her a job in a science museum. I gave several reasons why in Post #54. To follow up on Reason (4) in that post, even if she were a well qualified candidate, that doesn't mean she was the best qualified candidate. Suppose the hiring manager was a Harvard grad, and another candidate had a BS in physics from Harvard (which would give her an edge over the MIT grad because personal biases come into play), was fluent in five languages, had volunteered as a science tutor for the inner-city kids of Boston, ....

    And, on the flip side, I reiterate my caveat about being overqualified for certain positions. Proper fit is important.

    Or it could be simply a matter of personal chemistry during the interview. What one hiring manager might perceive as novel and charming, another hiring manager might perceive as contrived and overly cutesy.

    But, as I posted above, we have no details on what the position was and why she was rejected. So it's important for the OP not to draw any conclusions from this video ... particularly about the career opportunities with a physics degree or about the significance of a diploma from a name-brand school.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  5. Nov 15, 2017 #65
    <<Emphasis added>> I had to look that up. I nominate it for the new vocabulary word of the day. :-)
     
  6. Nov 15, 2017 #66
    The unemployment is high for young people, not for someone that is 61.
    The general unemployment is 11%.

    He said that he went to London and worked as a gardener, and as a dishwasher.
    After he comes back again in Italy ( the second time) and now he is one the street asking money.
    He also tried to open a library about Physics mysteries but he had to close it, because he failed.
     
  7. Nov 15, 2017 #67
    I'm not familiar with employment practices in Italy. But I know that in other European countries, greater age by itself and greater years seniority in a job provides greater job security. But that would apply mainly to people who were employed in that country when younger and continued in place. Wouldn't the fact that the physicist had previously left Italy make him more vulnerable to being unemployed? The customary protections and low unemployment rate for seniors wouldn't then apply.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2017
  8. Nov 16, 2017 #68

    Vanadium 50

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    She said she applied for one job and didn't get it.

    Are you seriously arguing that someone from MIT should get every single job they apply for? What if two MIT people apply for the same job?
     
  9. Nov 20, 2017 #69
    I'm not saying this, and I would be crazy to think in this way.
    My idea is that a person with a degree from MIT don't concern about not being accepted by one job.
    I just thought to say that a person with a physics degree from MIT had already job offers during university years, and that have so may opportunities that doesn't have the time to say that they don't know what to do to find a job.
    I usually thought this about almost every person that have a major in Physics, not only those ones who graduated at MIT.
     
  10. Nov 20, 2017 #70

    symbolipoint

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    Fantasy! Physics is great education but is not job-training. Students from ANY university still must HUNT for their jobs or career positions. A few of the very best at a school, might have a job offer just before or upon graduating. Even among MIT students, I'd still imagine that however good someone is, there is still someone better. You might be focusing excessively on big famous brand name schools and not enough on picking a major field and studying for at least bachelor degree.

    You need to, in a few weeks or so, pick a major field, choose and apply and gain admission to college or university, earn your degree (bachelor degree at first), and find and take a job. If you were to be good enough in your undergrad studies, maybe you could continue on for Master's degree.
     
  11. Nov 21, 2017 #71
    At physics or in general?
    Anyway, this happens at engineering courses in my country.
     
  12. Nov 21, 2017 #72

    symbolipoint

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    Anything with a demand for talented intelligent people (in this general case, students who earn a degree in any field that companies want such people for).
     
  13. Dec 1, 2017 #73
    My son got his undergrad degree in physics, he did it because he wanted it, not because there was a plethora of high paying jobs looking for physics degrees. He wants to eventually get his masters in it, but unsure of which discipline to pursue.

    In the meantime he got a good job for an engineering firm doing non destructive stress testing. Did he need his degree for this job? I don’t think so. Did it help him get the job? I’d venture most likely yes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2017
  14. Dec 1, 2017 #74
    Are you sure that for that kind of job, in order to analyze the tests, there isn't necessary a physics degree?

    Anyway, my aspiration is not to get a very high paid job, but just to find a job that is not teaching or researching.
     
  15. Dec 2, 2017 #75
    I'm pretty sure he told me that the degree wasn't a prerequisite, but he felt the degree helped him get the job.
     
  16. Dec 2, 2017 #76

    symbolipoint

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    Like I said before or in other topics, someone with bachelors degree is very smart and is without any doubt, trainable; so this person can learn many things - some on his own, and some with training, and again, he IS TRAINABLE very much so. Maybe the education and previous activity dedicated to Physics helped him; but maybe some kind of Engineering education would have done just the same for making him trainable...
     
  17. Dec 3, 2017 #77
    Again, training requirements depend on the field of application. If you are testing critical components such as jet engines or gas pipes for field installation, there are requirements for training and certification. In other instances, there are not. And again, depends on the level of responsibility. Are you the engineer responsible for specifying the tests and signing off on the results, or are you the technician performing the tests, following the engineer's instructions?
     
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