What language is important for EE to know.

  • #26
rbj
2,227
9
Until you leave school and realize no one outside your university uses Matlab.

wasn't my experience at all. the cost of getting MATLAB and a decent toolbox is a lot less than an EE's salary.

P.S. Scilab is a free clone if anyone is interested.

Octave is also free. didn't know that Scilab was a MATLAB clone. i thought it had different language syntax than MATLAB or Octave. but i never used Scilab, so i don't know.
 
  • #27
828
1
All the programs listed above are great tools for learning in school. They really are fantastic.

How many of them are going to actually carry into your workplace....besides Auto Cad?...not too many. But there are certainly some specialized fields that will use some like the C+ and the VHDL, etc.

As an electrical engineer that makes electrical construction drawings for factories and so forth....here are the programs I use:

AutoCad (everybody needs this)
MS Word (got to write those scopes)
MS Excel (gotta crunch those numbers)
AGI 32 (Advanced Lighting simulator....takes a couple days to learn like most programs)
Etap (it's a super program for plotting current and voltage curves for large motor start ups and for breaker setting times. Clients want these for all their big breakers.)

If you don't know something coming into work, no biggy. My boss made a great comment to a new 6 month guy out of school yesterday. The kid wasn't real familiar with excel....he was ok with it...but was missing a lot of the details. My boss said something to the effect of.....
"when a student comes out of college and comes here, we expect them to know absolutely nothing about electrical engineering as it pertains to work. But we do expect them to at least know MS word and MS excel". My boss is a really nice guy...but he was just saying.

Even if you know absolutely none of the programs I listed above...no biggy. They really only take a short time to learn.

Remember kids....commencement means "the beginning"......not "the end".

C or some other programming language is a pretty standard skill to expect out of new EE grads and I would not say "not too many" carry into your workplace. I would not call a field that uses C++ or VHDL "specialized" by any means. It sounds more like your job is the exception rather than the rule. Simply think of all the EE related products and industries, and then think of how much of those devices use some kind of software. Its more rare to find hardware that isn't running code of some kind (you then have to consider programming used for development/research as well as end application programming, and then there's still a lot of other software that needs to be written).
 
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  • #28
psparky
Gold Member
884
32
C or some other programming language is a pretty standard skill to expect out of new EE grads and I would not say "not too many" carry into your workplace. I would not call a field that uses C++ or VHDL "specialized" by any means. It sounds more like your job is the exception rather than the rule. Simply think of all the EE related products and industries, and then think of how much of those devices use some kind of software. Its more rare to find hardware that isn't running code of some kind (you then have to consider programming used for development/research as well as end application programming, and then there's still a lot of other software that needs to be written).

I certainly may be the exception....but working for an electrical engineering consulting firm that makes electrical construction drawings is very common in USA.
 

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