Atomic Radii Table | Element & Isotope Charge Radius

In summary, atomic radius is the distance from the center of an atom's nucleus to the outermost electrons and is measured in picometers or angstroms. It generally decreases from left to right across a period in the periodic table but increases from top to bottom within a group. Atomic radius differs from ionic radius, which refers to the size of an ion due to the loss or gain of electrons. Isotopes have the same atomic radius as they have the same number of protons and electrons, but isotopes with more neutrons may have a slightly larger atomic radius.
  • #1
Butch
1
0
I am doing some work on atomic structure.
I have an app for referencing the charge radius of nuclei of elements and their isotopes, however I need a table that has the atomic radii of the elements and their isotopes.
 
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  • #2
I suppose that to a very good approximation the atomic radii of isotopes are all the same. The atomic radii of the elements can be found, for example, on: http://periodic.lanl.gov/index.shtml
 

Related to Atomic Radii Table | Element & Isotope Charge Radius

1. What is an atomic radius?

The atomic radius is the distance from the center of an atom's nucleus to the outermost electrons. It is a measure of the size of an atom.

2. How is atomic radius measured?

Atomic radius is typically measured in picometers (pm) or angstroms (Å) using various experimental techniques such as X-ray crystallography or spectroscopy.

3. How does atomic radius vary across the periodic table?

Atomic radius generally decreases from left to right across a period in the periodic table due to the increasing number of protons and electrons, which leads to a stronger pull on the outermost electrons. However, atomic radius increases from top to bottom within a group due to the addition of new energy levels.

4. What is the difference between atomic radius and ionic radius?

Atomic radius refers to the size of an atom in its neutral state, while ionic radius refers to the size of an ion (an atom with a positive or negative charge) due to the loss or gain of electrons. Ionic radius is typically larger than atomic radius due to the change in electron configuration.

5. How do isotopes affect atomic radius?

Isotopes, which are atoms of the same element with different numbers of neutrons, have the same atomic radius as they have the same number of protons and electrons. However, isotopes with more neutrons may have a slightly larger atomic radius due to the increased mass of the nucleus.

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