Control Systems - Canonical Forms

The need for a similarity transform arises because even if the realization is observable, it may not be in the canonical form. In summary, the similarity transform T can be determined using the SVD decomposition of the observability matrix of (A, b, c) to bring the system to the observability canonical form, even if (A, b, c) is not observable.
  • #1
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Given an observable realization (A,b,c). Determine in terms of the matrices A,b, and c the similarity transfrom T, that brings the this system to the observability canonical form. Can this be done if (A,b,c) is not observable too?

I don't know where to start. I am thinking pick matrices(A,b,c) with arbitrary random values
or do I have to find first whether this system is observable? If the realization is observable isn't it already in the canonical form? Why the need for a similarity transform?
 
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  • #2
Yes, it is possible to determine the similarity transform T even if (A, b, c) is not observable. The similarity transform T can be determined by first finding the observability matrix of (A, b, c), and then using the SVD decomposition to find the components of T.
 

Related to Control Systems - Canonical Forms

1. What is a canonical form in control systems?

A canonical form in control systems is a special representation of a system that simplifies its mathematical analysis and design. It is a normalized form of the system's transfer function or state space model, which allows for easier interpretation and manipulation of the system's dynamics.

2. What are the advantages of using a canonical form in control systems?

There are several advantages of using a canonical form in control systems. Firstly, it allows for a simpler and more intuitive understanding of the system's behavior. Secondly, it facilitates the design of controllers for the system, as the canonical form has a direct relationship with the controller parameters. Lastly, it enables the use of powerful mathematical tools, such as pole placement and state feedback, for system analysis and design.

3. How many types of canonical forms are there in control systems?

There are three main types of canonical forms in control systems: controllable canonical form, observable canonical form, and Jordan canonical form. Each type has its own unique properties and is used for different purposes in system analysis and design.

4. How do I convert a system into its canonical form?

The process of converting a system into its canonical form varies depending on the type of canonical form and the type of system (transfer function or state space) being used. Generally, it involves using mathematical transformations, such as similarity transformations or state transformations, to manipulate the system's equations into the desired form.

5. Can a system have multiple canonical forms?

Yes, a system can have multiple canonical forms. The choice of which canonical form to use depends on the specific needs and goals of the analysis or design task. In some cases, it may be beneficial to convert the system into multiple canonical forms to gain different insights into its behavior.

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