Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Diamagnetism experiment with copper/lead

  1. Aug 8, 2017 #1
    I'm new to the concept of diamagnetism, but it seems very fascinating, and I'd like to try a simple experiment. Say I wanted to repel a small piece of lead (or copper, both are readily available to me) about 3.5 grams, how strong of a magnet would I need? Could I just use small neodymium magnets or would a more serious electromagnet be needed? Is there a way to calculate the needed magnetic field strength and compare it to the magnetic susceptibility value of lead or copper? Excuse me if I've made any fundamental errors, as I've only really read about it a bit on the internet.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 8, 2017 #2

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    It is a weak effect, but you can demonstrate it with permanent magnets if you have a setup that reacts to small forces. Here is an example with a rolling soda can.
     
  4. Aug 8, 2017 #3
    From what I've read, you can't increase the diamagnetic strength of an object, but increasing the strength of the magnetic field it is present in pushes it away harder. If you theoretically had a super strong permanent or electromagnet, would you be able to repel the small sample of lead?
     
  5. Aug 8, 2017 #4

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    Every moving magnet will lead to a force, stronger magnets just lead to stronger forces. There is no threshold.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted



Similar Discussions: Diamagnetism experiment with copper/lead
Loading...