Difference between calcultaed slope and slope given on the graph?

In summary, the question is asking how to compare the calculated slope (0.2460 met./sec.) to the slope displayed on the graph (0.2487 met./sec). The difference between the two slopes can be found by subtracting them (0.0027 units). It is suggested to use the percent error formula to determine if the actual slope falls within the range of acceptable values based on the uncertainty of the measurements. This can help identify potential errors in the measurements.
  • #1
science_rules
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2

Homework Statement


When question is asked: "How close is the slope (from an X-t graph) you calculated and the value actually displayed on the graph?"---does this mean you simply subtract your calculated velocity(slope of X-t graph) from the slope actually given on the graph?


Homework Equations


your calculated slope is 0.2460 met./sec.
the slope given on the graph is 0.2487 met./sec
So, the difference between these should be 0.2487 - 0.2460 = 0.0027 units??


The Attempt at a Solution


i am unsure if i need to use the percent error formula or just simply subtract the two slopes to get the difference. actually, i am unsure of when you are supposed to use the percent error formula. Does the percent error formula have anything to do with this particular problem?
 
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  • #2
I think a good approach would be to develop the error uncertainty from the calculated measurements and then determine if the actual slope lies within the range of acceptable values of the slope from the uncertainty.

If it dosn't then maybe you want to check your error assumptions as regards your measurements.
 
  • #3


The difference between the calculated slope and the slope given on the graph is simply the difference in the numerical values. In this case, it is 0.0027 units. This means that there is a small discrepancy between the two values, but it is not significant enough to warrant the use of the percent error formula. The percent error formula is typically used when comparing experimental results to theoretical or accepted values. In this case, both the calculated slope and the slope given on the graph are experimental values, so the percent error formula is not necessary. However, if you were comparing your calculated slope to a theoretical value, then you could use the percent error formula to determine the accuracy of your results.
 

Related to Difference between calcultaed slope and slope given on the graph?

1. What is the difference between the calculated slope and the slope given on the graph?

The calculated slope is the numerical value obtained by dividing the change in the y-values by the change in the x-values of two points on a graph. The slope given on the graph is the slope of the line drawn on the graph, which can be estimated visually.

2. Which slope is more accurate, the calculated slope or the slope given on the graph?

The calculated slope is more accurate as it is based on precise numerical calculations rather than visual estimation. However, the slope given on the graph can provide a good approximation of the actual slope.

3. How do you calculate the slope given on a graph?

The slope given on a graph can be calculated by selecting two points on the line and using the formula: slope = (y2 - y1) / (x2 - x1), where (x1, y1) and (x2, y2) are the coordinates of the two points.

4. Why is there a difference between the calculated slope and the slope given on the graph?

The difference between the calculated slope and the slope given on the graph can be due to errors in the visual estimation of the slope or rounding errors in the numerical calculations. It can also be caused by the use of different points on the line for calculation.

5. Which slope should be used for further analysis, the calculated slope or the slope given on the graph?

The calculated slope should be used for further analysis as it provides a more accurate representation of the slope of the line. However, if the graph is the only source of information, the slope given on the graph can be used as an approximate value.

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