Electric Potential/Work Question

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In summary, the work required to push 2 electrons through an electric field to attain an electric potential of 1 volt is 2 electronvolts. The same work would be required for a single electron, as long as they are taken over the same path. The equation W = qV may be used to calculate the work.
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Homework Statement



Work is required to push a solitary electron into an electric field where it attains an electric potential of 1 volt.

a.) If you instead push 2 electrons through the same path, what would the electric potential of the two electrons be? b.) What would the work required to move the electrons be?


Homework Equations



I'm not sure, but I think W = qV may be an equation.


The Attempt at a Solution



I am guessing that is it's 2 volts for a.) and 2 electronvolts for b.), but I could be wrong. Any help would be greatly appreciated... this is very confusing to me. =( Thanks!
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF.

If you are pushing something in the field, then 1e or 2e, they will experience then the same ΔV if the statement of the problem is that they are being taken over the same path. 1v then would be the potential at the point that 1 or 2 electrons would be brought.

As you noted though the ΔV*q is the work, so yes you would have imparted 2 ev to the charges (taken together).
 
  • #3


I can confirm that W = qV is indeed the correct equation to use in this scenario. In order to solve for the electric potential of two electrons, we need to consider the fact that electric potential is a scalar quantity and therefore follows the principle of superposition. This means that the potential of multiple charges can be calculated by simply adding their individual potentials.

In this case, since we are pushing two electrons through the same path, the electric potential of the two electrons would be twice that of a single electron, so it would be 2 volts.

As for the work required to move the electrons, we can use the same equation W = qV. Since the charge of two electrons is double that of a single electron, the work required would also be double. Therefore, it would be 2 electronvolts.

I hope this helps clarify any confusion. Remember to always use the correct equations and consider the principles of superposition when dealing with multiple charges in an electric field.
 

What is electric potential?

Electric potential is a measure of the amount of electrical potential energy that a charged particle has at a specific point in space.

How is electric potential different from electric field?

Electric potential is a scalar quantity that describes the potential energy of a charged particle, while electric field is a vector quantity that describes the force experienced by a charged particle in an electric field.

What is the equation for electric potential?

The equation for electric potential is V = kQ/r, where V is the electric potential, k is the Coulomb's constant, Q is the charge of the particle, and r is the distance from the particle to the point in space where the potential is being measured.

What is the relationship between electric potential and work?

Electric potential is related to work through the equation W = qV, where W is the work done on a charged particle, q is the charge of the particle, and V is the change in electric potential between two points.

How is electric potential used in practical applications?

Electric potential is used in a variety of practical applications, including determining the voltage of batteries, calculating the strength of electric fields, and understanding the behavior of charged particles in circuits and electronic devices.

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