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Ethical Dilemna - Finding Money In Random Places

  1. 10

    8.7%
  2. 100

    52.2%
  3. 1000

    39.1%
  4. A bag full of cash ( possibly hundreds of thousands of dollars )

    30.4%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Jan 31, 2009 #1

    GCT

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    I just found a ten dollar bill while taking a walk through my suburbia , it's seemed pretty obvious to me that there was no dilemna to be acknolwedged here and that it was perfectly fine to keep the money - am I going to ring the doorbell on every house and ask " is this your 10 bucks " - the answer to that is no.

    So here is the question - at what dollar amount would you have sensed the obligation to initiate an investigation before you kept it?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 31, 2009 #2

    Evo

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    Is it in a money bag like a business uses and might have been a theft or a paper bag?

    If it's in a plain paper bag, it's mine.
     
  4. Jan 31, 2009 #3

    Kurdt

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    I found five pounds on the floor of the local shop yesterday. I gave it to the woman on the checkout in case somebody came back for it. I've also given as little as a pound back when I got too much change before. Of course it depends on the situation but in most cases I'd at least try something to find the person who lost it.
     
  5. Jan 31, 2009 #4
    Recently, there was one similar thread (not the same subject) - about one old lady finding 10K.

    It depends on where you found them
    - a place where all people are rich (1000 would be mine answer in that case)
    - a place where people cannot afford to lose 10 (10$ in that case)
    - bad neighborhood (best not to touch the money) (I would never investigate)
     
  6. Jan 31, 2009 #5

    Evo

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    I found 3 dollars in the change dispenser at an automated check out. I gave it to the clerk overseeing the check out stands, just in case the person realized they forgot their change, that was an undertandible mistake and i wouldn't feel right taking it.

    But a paper bag lying in the road with hundreds of thousands of dollars = my lucky day. That's really dumb. I would donate part of it to the local animal shelters though.

    GCT, you forgot an option for "none of the above".
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2009
  7. Jan 31, 2009 #6

    russ_watters

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    Unless the quantity is huge, it depends on the container. If you literally find a big pile of cash in the street, it may actually be illegal to take it if it fell out of an armored car, even if it isn't in a bag.
     
  8. Jan 31, 2009 #7

    russ_watters

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  9. Jan 31, 2009 #8

    Evo

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  10. Jan 31, 2009 #9
    Who carries more than 1000 cash either in plain or marked paper bag?
    I think most people use credit cards. I don't own one but I do shopping with my university card + debit card. I never have cash of more than 200.
     
  11. Jan 31, 2009 #10

    lisab

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    I don't think I would go door-to-door finding the rightful owner of ten dollars, but I couldn't keep it either. At my grocery store there's a food bank collection box - I'd put it in an envelope and put it in the box. Especially now, they need it more than I do.

    A hundred dollars? Yeah, I'd probably knock on a few doors, at least.
     
  12. Jan 31, 2009 #11

    Evo

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    I would just assume that some dishonest person would say that it's theirs. I guess I don't have much faith in people in general. :frown:
     
  13. Jan 31, 2009 #12

    LowlyPion

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    Good luck with that. Money blowing in the wind?

    What crime is that again?

    My guess is they didn't prosecute a single person. It sounds like a scare tactic to hopefully jog some consciences and encourage whatever recovery they could. Whoever spilled it was on the hook.

    If it was a really lot of money, I'd turn it in immediately and then reread Steinbeck's The Pearl, before I started second-guessing myself.
     
  14. Jan 31, 2009 #13

    CRGreathouse

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    Back when I was in high school I found a $10 bill on the floor and turned it in to the Dean.
     
  15. Jan 31, 2009 #14

    Hurkyl

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    Wikipedia has something, but the references seem to be broken. :frown:
     
  16. Jan 31, 2009 #15

    LowlyPion

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    If a law can't be enforced, it has no practical effect.

    The idea that there would be prosecution is pretty absurd under the circumstances of the situation, and it was clearly a hollow threat. Personally I'd be tempted not to turn it in if that was their attitude.
     
  17. Jan 31, 2009 #16

    russ_watters

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    Taking something that isn't yours would be called "theft"...
    Definitely not a scare tactic, but it may have been hard to identify anyone. I'll see if i can find links about people prosecuted for this...
     
  18. Jan 31, 2009 #17

    LowlyPion

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    Under the law it maybe called theft. But I'd say it is highly improbable, if you didn't incriminate yourself by say bragging you found $350 and had a great night at the bar, telling anyone and everyone, that anything could be proved.

    So they have your picture? They have you picking up something? Cash is highly fungible and proving it as theirs and how much it was absent recovery in your possession and your refusal to cooperate, I'd say there's virtually no case.
     
  19. Jan 31, 2009 #18
    since all money is uniquely identifiable, it is a reasonable request to ask that they provide serial numbers.
     
  20. Jan 31, 2009 #19

    Hurkyl

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    You asked what crime was committed. You got an answer. Talk about whether or not there is a case is irrelevant to whether or not it's a crime. :tongue:

    Angling back to the original topic you seem to be pushing for the "it's okay to commit a crime if you don't get caught" school of ethics... is that intentional?
     
  21. Jan 31, 2009 #20

    Mk

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    I believe this reminds me of admiralty law. The captain's word is law. When he goes out in the ocean on his boat, he has a 40 foot floating country. It's his country and he is a dictator. He can throw you in the brig for anything he wants. If I'm floating out there in the ocean on my boat and I find another boat and there's nobody on it, who owns it? Me, now, I'm the captain! It's called salvage rights. I found it, no body else claimed it, end of story, and it's not theft.

    Everybody has a right to due process under common law, but this definitely isn't common law since the ownership of what property is not clearly defined.
     
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