Exploring Fishing Rod Weight and Casting Distance: A Newbie's Question

  • I
  • Thread starter rdchin71
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Hello Rod
In summary: I can'tprove it. But neither post includes a fully characterised angler body with a known 'performance'.
  • #1
rdchin71
3
0
TL;DR Summary
My question is - if there are 2 fishing rod, one lighter than the other. Will the lighter fishing rod cast a lure/bait further than the heavier fishing rod, assuming the rod length, lure/bait weight and everything else is constant.
Hello, I am new to this forum.

I have a question, hope I'll find some answers here.

My question is - if there are 2 fishing rod, one lighter (physical weight) than the other. Will the lighter fishing rod cast a lure/bait further than the heavier fishing rod, assuming the rod length, lure/bait weight and everything else is constant.

Thank you for taking the time to reply!
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
It isn't just the weight, but rather the stiffness and flexibility of the rod. If you are doing fly-fishing, for example, how much the rod bends allows you to store potential energy in it and so when it "unbends", all that energy can be transferred to cast your lure far away.

Light weight-material can have high stiffness (carbon fiber) the same way heavier ones do. So it isn't just about the weight, but also the material.

Zz.
 
  • #3
Thank you for the reply.

As I have mentioned, everything else is constant which includes the flexibility of the rod.
 
  • #4
rdchin71 said:
Thank you for the reply.

As I have mentioned, everything else is constant which includes the flexibility of the rod.

Then you have just asked an impossible question. Two objects of identical material and identical dimensions and shape can't have different weights.

Zz.
 
  • Like
Likes Vanadium 50 and sophiecentaur
  • #5
The performance and skill of the angler are by far the most important factors. Baseball and cricket bats are widely discussed in fora and iirc, it’s a matter of matching bat weight to the user’s characteristics.
Science and calculations are often Ill suited to these things, especially when an experienced user is involved.
The adverts will not be reliable sources of opinion.
 
  • #6
sophiecentaur said:
Science and calculations are often Ill suited to these things, especially when an experienced user is involved.
Well said. That's the point @rdchin71 , it is not a science question.
 
  • Like
Likes sophiecentaur
  • #7
anorlunda said:
Well said. That's the point @rdchin71 , it is not a science question.

No, I disagree that this was his/her point. He/she posted this in a science forum, and specifically in the Classical Physics forum. What non-science motive can there be?

And I do agree that in the end, this is more of a skill issue rather than an equipment issue. But I still stand by my claim that given the parameters that the OP has stated, this is an impossible question.

Zz.
 
  • #8
rdchin71 said:
As I have mentioned, everything else is constant which includes the flexibility of the rod.
Assuming that two rods of equal characteristics except for weight can be made, the heavier one will have a slower angular acceleration (given the same torque applied by the angler). That slower acceleration will result in a lower linear velocity for the lure end of the line, so it will travel a shorter distance.

If the angler can vary their strength (torque applied during casting), and can launch the two lures with the same linear velocity, then they will travel the same distance.
 
  • Like
Likes jack action and Lnewqban
  • #9
I agree with berkeman.
Everything else being equal, including the weight distribution along the rods, as well as the input torque and angular displacement of both rods:
The lower moment of inertia or rotational inertia of the lighter rod would result in a greater angular acceleration.
That will produce a higher initial velocity of the bait, which should fly farther.
This is equivalent to how the mass of a body determines the force needed for a desired linear acceleration.
 
  • #10
anorlunda said:
Well said. That's the point @rdchin71 , it is not a science question.
I agree and, of course, you will never get an 'answer' to the question but it is interesting to consider the question and posts like:
berkeman said:
Assuming that two rods of equal characteristics except for weight can be made, the heavier one will have a slower angular acceleration (given the same torque applied by the angler). That slower acceleration will result in a lower linear velocity for the lure end of the line, so it will travel a shorter distance.

If the angler can vary their strength (torque applied during casting), and can launch the two lures with the same linear velocity, then they will travel the same distance.

and

Lnewqban said:
I agree with berkeman.
Everything else being equal, including the weight distribution along the rods, as well as the input torque and angular displacement of both rods:
The lower moment of inertia or rotational inertia of the lighter rod would result in a greater angular acceleration.
That will produce a higher initial velocity of the bait, which should fly farther.
This is equivalent to how the mass of a body determines the force needed for a desired linear acceleration.

prove it. But neither post includes a fully characterised angler body with a known 'performance'. It would spoil the fun of the whole exercise to substitute the angler with an electric motor with a given power output and an optimised gear box to rotate the rod and ' let go' at precisely the right instant. I know all about incompetence and randomness in using a rod and reel, so I speak with great authority here. o:)
 
  • Haha
Likes berkeman
  • #11
berkeman said:
Assuming that two rods of equal characteristics except for weight can be made, the heavier one will have a slower angular acceleration (given the same torque applied by the angler). That slower acceleration will result in a lower linear velocity for the lure end of the line, so it will travel a shorter distance.

If the angler can vary their strength (torque applied during casting), and can launch the two lures with the same linear velocity, then they will travel the same distance.

This is exactly what I thought.

Assuming I made a rod (rod A) that is X% lighter than rod B. They both have the same flex, same strength, same length, characteristic etc and I have the same person casting with each rod, common sense tells me that “rod A” should cast further as per Berkeman stated.

If I want to market “Rod A” as an invention that has superior casting capabilities compared to what is available in the existing market because it is physically lighter in weight and thus able to cast longer distances. How do I convince quoting a law of physics or the science behind it.

Thank you once again for the participation. I am not physics trained so I hope what I mentioned made sense.
 
  • #12
Hopefully you have seen from the replies in this thread that if you want to create a rod that casts very far, you don't just vary the weight. There is much more that goes into creating a great casting rod (including developing the skills to use it well).

How long have you been fishing, and what kind of fishing have you done so far? What is your favorite rod/reel for casting for Bass so far, and what do you like about it? Have you learned to fly fish yet? If so, what rod and line combination do you like the best?

https://www.bradwiegmann.com/images/stories/Bass_Pros/Cameron_Gautney/Cameron-casting.jpg

1581898475320.png
https://troutbitten.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Troutbitten_Josh_Darling_Angler-Green-Casting.jpg

1581898617644.png
 
  • #13
rdchin71 said:
If I want to market “Rod A” as an invention that has superior casting capabilities compared to what is available in the existing market because it is physically lighter in weight and thus able to cast longer distances. How do I convince quoting a law of physics or the science behind it.
Didn't you just say
rdchin71 said:
Assuming I made a rod (rod A) that is X% lighter than rod B. They both have the same flex, same strength, same length, characteristic etc and I have the same person casting with each rod
You are going overboard here, as to what is superior.
Lighter doesn't mean that the lure can be cast a farther distance unless you are comparing a "lighter" rod to someone using a telephone pole weight rod.<-- hyperbole if you didn't notice. The user would, change his style and torque on the rod to compensate. In addition, there probably is "feel" that each particular user would just like for a rod being made just for him. Some might like a bit of weight, and some might not. Too light of a rod, and you might get complaints that there is nothing there. As said before, it is not just about lighter being better for a cast, but many casts.

What comes into play with lighter is continued use, and less fatigue for the user over repetitive castings.

And some weight balance between lure weight and the rod and handle weight I suspect.
 
  • Like
Likes sophiecentaur and berkeman
  • #14
rdchin71 said:
Assuming I made a rod (rod A) that is X% lighter than rod B. They both have the same flex, same strength, same length, characteristic etc and I have the same person casting with each rod, common sense tells me that “rod A” should cast further as per Berkeman stated.

If I want to market “Rod A” as an invention that has superior casting capabilities compared to what is available in the existing market because it is physically lighter in weight and thus able to cast longer distances. How do I convince quoting a law of physics or the science behind it.

Thank you once again for the participation. I am not physics trained so I hope what I mentioned made sense.

Here's a though that may add fuel to this fire and shows, even more, how there are too many variables for a Physics approach. One of the essential factors in a useful casting rod is the fact that it actually stores energy like a spring. It carries on delivering energy to the tackle, long after you can't put any more in from your muscles (your arm is now pointing out forwards but the rod tip may be just abeam of you). The weight (mass) of the moving rod contributes to the available energy at this stage. As with bats, there is a limit to muscle power available but, otoh, a massless rod would carry no Kinetic Energy; there will be an optimum, depending entirely on the angler's strength, arm length etc..
The position of your two hands on the rod will affect the torque you can exert and you will choose what feels best.

Casting length depends a lot on the mass of the sinker and anglers have a range of weights to give the best cast length for the wind conditions. Different weights would call for different rods.

The good news is that, as every angler knows, it is essential to own as many rods as you can actually carry to the fishing site and almost as many reels, lures, weights, snake oil bottles etc. All this goes to make the total fishing experience what it is and allows you to experiment during each session. You do the sums, unconsciously, in your head.
 
  • Like
Likes 256bits and berkeman

Related to Exploring Fishing Rod Weight and Casting Distance: A Newbie's Question

1. What is the relationship between fishing rod weight and casting distance?

The weight of a fishing rod can impact how far you are able to cast. Generally, a lighter rod will allow for a longer cast, while a heavier rod may limit your casting distance. This is because a lighter rod requires less effort to cast and can be moved through the air more easily.

2. How does the length of a fishing rod affect casting distance?

The length of a fishing rod can also impact casting distance. A longer rod can typically cast further than a shorter rod, as it has a longer lever arm to generate more force. However, longer rods may also be more difficult to handle and control, so it is important to find the right balance for your skill level and fishing needs.

3. What are the differences between a spinning rod and a baitcasting rod in terms of casting distance?

Spinning rods and baitcasting rods use different mechanisms for casting, which can affect the distance you are able to cast. Generally, baitcasting rods are better for longer casts, as they allow for more control and precision. However, it may take more practice to master the technique of casting with a baitcasting rod.

4. How does the weight of the lure or bait affect casting distance?

The weight of the lure or bait being used can also impact casting distance. Heavier lures or baits will require more force to cast, so a heavier rod may be necessary for longer casts. However, if the lure or bait is too heavy for the rod, it may cause strain or damage to the rod.

5. Are there any other factors besides rod weight that can affect casting distance?

Yes, there are several other factors that can affect casting distance, such as the type and quality of fishing line being used, weather conditions, and the skill level of the angler. It is important to consider all of these factors when trying to achieve the longest possible cast.

Similar threads

  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
8
Views
12K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
8
Views
4K
  • General Engineering
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Mechanics
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
661
  • Science Fiction and Fantasy Media
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Electromagnetism
Replies
28
Views
2K
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
27
Views
3K
Back
Top