Find the Optimum Spot to Minimize Wave Action in Large Water Tank Experiment

In summary, the experiment involves generating water waves with straight, parallel wave fronts and passing them through two openings 5.00 m apart in a long board. The end of the tank is 3.00 m beyond the board. To receive little or no wave action, one would stand at the points where the distances from the two openings differ by 1/2 wavelength.
  • #1
simplicity12
28
0

Homework Statement


In a large water tank experiment, water waves are generated with straight, parallel wave fronts, 3.00 m apart. The wave fronts pass through two openings 5.00 m apart in a long board. The end of the tank is 3.00 m beyond the board. Where would you stand, relative to the perpendicular bisector of the line between the openings, if you want to receive little or no wave action?

2. Homework Equations

[P(n)*S(1)] - [P(n)*S(2)] = (n - 1/2)*wavelength

sin ANGLE(n) = (n - 1/2)*wavelength/(distance between sources)

x(n) / L = (n - 1/2) * wavelength / (distance between sources)


The Attempt at a Solution


I tried using the third formula, allowing the n be 1, the wavelength 3.00 m and the distance between the two sources 5.00 m, but i don't know what value i should assign x(n) and L. I don't know if I'm doing the question right. Can anyone help?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
This sounds like 2 slit interference. The points of no wave motion would be the places where the distances from the slits differ by 1/2 wavelength..
 
  • #3


I would approach this problem by first understanding the physical principles at play. In this experiment, we are dealing with water waves and their interference patterns. The goal is to find the optimum spot where the waves cancel each other out, resulting in little or no wave action.

To determine this spot, we can use the principle of superposition, which states that when two waves meet, the resulting displacement is the sum of the displacements of the individual waves. This means that when two waves meet in opposite phases (crest meets trough), they cancel each other out.

In this case, the two openings in the board act as two coherent sources of waves, with a wavelength of 3.00 m. The perpendicular bisector of the line between the two openings will be the line where the waves from both sources meet in opposite phases. This means that standing on this line will result in little or no wave action.

To determine where this line is, we can use the equation x(n) / L = (n - 1/2) * wavelength / (distance between sources), where x(n) is the position of the line, L is the distance between the two sources (5.00 m in this case), and n is the order of the interference pattern. For the first order (n=1), we get x(1) / 5.00 m = (1 - 1/2) * 3.00 m / 5.00 m, which simplifies to x(1) = 0.3 m. This means that the perpendicular bisector is 0.3 m away from the line connecting the two sources.

Therefore, to minimize wave action, I would stand 0.3 m away from the line connecting the two sources, on the side that is closer to the end of the tank. This is the optimum spot where the waves from the two sources will cancel each other out, resulting in little or no wave action.
 

Related to Find the Optimum Spot to Minimize Wave Action in Large Water Tank Experiment

1. What is the purpose of this experiment?

The purpose of this experiment is to find the optimum spot within a large water tank where the wave action is minimized. This can be useful in designing structures such as breakwaters or offshore platforms to reduce the impact of waves.

2. How is the optimum spot determined?

The optimum spot is determined by measuring the wave action at different locations within the water tank and analyzing the data to identify the spot with the lowest wave action. This can be done by using sensors to measure the wave height and frequency at different points in the tank.

3. What factors can affect the wave action in the water tank?

Several factors can affect the wave action in the water tank, including the size and shape of the tank, the depth of the water, and the speed and direction of the wind. These factors can create different wave patterns and affect the overall wave action in the tank.

4. How is the data collected and analyzed?

The data is collected through sensors placed at different locations within the water tank. The sensors record the wave height and frequency at each point, and this data is then analyzed using statistical methods and visualizations to identify the optimum spot with the lowest wave action.

5. What are the potential applications of this experiment?

The findings of this experiment can be applied in various engineering and construction projects, such as designing more efficient and stable offshore structures, improving coastal protection systems, and optimizing the placement of underwater cables and pipelines to minimize the impact of waves.

Similar threads

Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
4K
Back
Top