Finding minimum distance to stop using friction and velocity

  • Thread starter trivk96
  • Start date
  • #1
47
0

Homework Statement



A car is traveling at 44.4 mi/h on a horizontal
highway.
The acceleration of gravity is 9.8 m/s2
.
If the coefficient of friction between road
and tires on a rainy day is 0.13, what is the
minimum distance in which the car will stop?
(1 mi = 1.609)
Answer in units of meters


Homework Equations


x=xo+vot + at2
Ff=μ*Fn



The Attempt at a Solution



I honestly have no idea
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
318
0
I'd use the kinetic energy work theorem. You learn that yet?
 
  • #3
318
0
or you could use basic kinematic equations to solve this.
 
  • #4
47
0
Haven't learned kinetic energy work theorems. Could you help me through the easier process. I have a test tomorrow and I want to understand this.
 
  • #5
318
0
adding kinetic energy theorem to the problem basically takes into account mass while kinematic equations still hold true. I'd rather go into the kinematic equation realm. Basically, this is asking you what the acceleration of the car is and what distance the car travels if an initial velocity is 44.4mi/h. Convert that to meters/second.
 
  • #6
318
0
and if you are ready for the test, then you'll use V^2=V0^2 + 2ax to get the x I mean the right answer.
 
  • #7
559
8
[itex]D=\frac{v_{o}^{2}}{2μg}[/itex]

I believe that is the equation.
 
  • #8
318
0
i raid is correct!
 

Related Threads on Finding minimum distance to stop using friction and velocity

  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
12
Views
4K
Replies
1
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
10K
  • Last Post
Replies
12
Views
26K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
688
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
12K
Replies
23
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
3K
Top