Finding Wavelength: Solving with Frequency and Length

In summary, the conversation is about a lab that requires finding the wavelength using a chart with given values for frequency, period, length, and wavelength. The equation for finding the wavelength is mentioned, along with a potential solution using the lengths and subsequent harmonics. The type of pipe being used and its open/closed ends may affect the calculation. The possibility of other experimental considerations, such as the speed of sound in the tube and end corrections, is also mentioned.
  • #1
matt1687
4
0

Homework Statement


i'm doing a lab and i have a chart which requires me to find the wavelength. The chart looks like this:

Frequency(f) Period (T) Length (l) Wavelength (lambda)
512 ? .15 ?

Homework Equations


the equation is basically what I am looking for



The Attempt at a Solution


I think that L1=1/4 (lambda), and every time you go up a length is goes up (3/4, 5/4 etc.) Is this correct? Because then i could just sub in the length and solve for lambda.
 
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  • #2
Sorry my chart didnt turn out the way i wanted, its supposed to say frequency = 512, period is unknown, length is .15, and wavelength is unknown
 
  • #3
It depends on whether or not the pipe is open at both ends or just open at one end. (The one where you hold the tuning fork - or whatever you use to set the air in motion)
If the wavelengths for subsequent harmonics (higher frequencies) are given as lambda= 1/4, 3/4, 5/4 etc times L, then this is true for a pipe that is closed at one end.
So yes. In that case, the wavelength can be found from the length of the pipe and the frequency of its vibration.
I assume you are using different driving frequencies to find different resonances in the same pipe. It's not 100% clear what you are doing, so I'm guessing a little.
There are a couple of other experimental considerations which may or may not be relevant to your investigation, depending on the level you are at. If your teacher has not mentioned them, it probably won't matter. It's worth checking, though.
a) is the speed of sound in the tube, the same as that in free air?
b) there is something called an "end correction" which may be important.
 

Related to Finding Wavelength: Solving with Frequency and Length

1. What is the relationship between wavelength, frequency, and length?

Wavelength, frequency, and length are all interconnected properties of a wave. Wavelength is the distance between two consecutive peaks or troughs of a wave, frequency is the number of complete waves passing a point in a given time, and length is the physical distance that the wave travels. Mathematically, wavelength = speed of light/frequency, and frequency = speed of light/wavelength.

2. How do you calculate wavelength when given frequency and length?

To calculate wavelength, use the formula wavelength = speed of light/frequency. The speed of light is a constant value of approximately 3 x 10^8 meters per second, so you can plug in the given frequency and solve for wavelength in meters.

3. How does the wavelength of a wave affect its properties?

The wavelength of a wave affects its properties in several ways. Longer wavelengths have lower frequencies and therefore lower energies, while shorter wavelengths have higher frequencies and energies. Wavelength also determines the type of wave, such as radio waves, visible light, or X-rays. Additionally, the wavelength of a wave can be used to determine the speed of the wave.

4. What is the difference between wavelength and amplitude?

Wavelength and amplitude are two different properties of a wave. Wavelength is the distance between two consecutive peaks or troughs of a wave, while amplitude is the maximum displacement of a wave from its equilibrium position. In other words, wavelength measures the physical distance of the wave, while amplitude measures the intensity or height of the wave.

5. How is wavelength used in practical applications?

Wavelength is used in many practical applications, including telecommunications, medicine, and astronomy. In telecommunications, different wavelengths of light are used to transmit data through fiber optic cables. In medicine, wavelengths of light are used in various imaging techniques, such as X-rays and MRI scans. In astronomy, the wavelength of light is used to study the composition and properties of objects in space.

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