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Force and momentum

  1. Jan 9, 2005 #1
    If I dropped a 5kg ball, from a 2m distance, the force acting upon it will be constant right? How would I get the final velocity of the ball before it hit the floor using this equation:
    [tex]\vec{F}=\frac{d\vec{p}}{dt}[/tex]
     
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  3. Jan 9, 2005 #2

    Gokul43201

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    If you can find time taken, T , then rewriting your equation

    [tex]\int _0 ^T\vec{F}dt =\vec{p}_{fin}-\vec{p}_{in}[/tex]
     
  4. Jan 9, 2005 #3

    dextercioby

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    It is quite weird to chose this equation,which assumes many calculations which could be shortcutted by applying the law of total energy conservation.


    Daniel.

    PS.In physics problem,always try to chose the easiest path to reach at your results...It saves energy,paper and neurons...
     
  5. Jan 9, 2005 #4
    It is needed that use that equation, I'm trying to prove newton's second law in a momentum project.

    The force is constant so time is not dependant right?
    F=pf-pi
    ma=mv-0
    a=v?
     
  6. Jan 9, 2005 #5

    HallsofIvy

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    Why in the world would you think F= pf- pi?? That is NOT the equation that you quote. The equation you quote is
    [tex]\int _0 ^T\vec{F}dt =\vec{p}_{fin}-\vec{p}_{in}[/tex]

    The left side is [itex]\int_0^T\vec{F}dt[/itex], not F!
     
  7. Jan 9, 2005 #6

    dextercioby

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    This is absurd.Newton's laws are postulated,axioms,they cannot be proved.It's like proving Schroedinger' equation,or the postulates of thermodynamics or the postulates of statistical mechanics (the axiomatical approach)... :grumpy:

    Daniel.
     
  8. Jan 9, 2005 #7
    OKay, back to my example, I dropped a 5kg ball. The force is about 50N. This force is constant. Lets say it took 2 seconds to drop. Then change in time is 2s. How would I integrate that? 50x=mv?
     
  9. Jan 9, 2005 #8
    Sorry, I mean verify
     
  10. Jan 9, 2005 #9

    dextercioby

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    Aha...That's something else.And it sounds right... :tongue2:

    It would be correct,if that "x" would be 2s.I guess it was a typo...

    Daniel.
     
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