I Gravitational potential gradient in accelerated reference frames?

Summary
Is there any speed-of-time gradient there?
Hi,

Could you please help me to clarify the following problem? In the gravitational field of a mass, the force on a body in steady state comes from the gradient of the gravitational potential - or the gradient of speed of time. But what about accelerated reference frames? I assume that there is no speed-of-time gradient, right? However, we state that the two type of field are indistunguishable, ie. the same.
 

Ibix

Science Advisor
Insights Author
4,685
3,029
I assume that there is no speed-of-time gradient, right?
You assume wrongly. Calling it a "speed of time" isn't the best way of doing it, but clocks along the length of an accelerating rocket do tick at different rates consistent with a "gravitational redshift".
However, we state that the two type of field are indistunguishable, ie. the same.
That's not quite accurate. The equivalence principle says that being at rest in a gravitational field and accelerating in flat spacetime are locally indistinguishable. But that doesn't affect my answer above.
 

Want to reply to this thread?

"Gravitational potential gradient in accelerated reference frames?" You must log in or register to reply here.

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving

Hot Threads

Top