Help with Counter Wiring Problem Statement

In summary, the conversation discusses the problem of creating a 12 bit counter using 4 bit counters. The person is struggling to understand the circuits and terminology involved and is seeking help in planning out the circuit. They are attempting to connect the counters together and have questions about how to deal with the input and output pins. The conversation also mentions the use of a datasheet to understand the connections and the need for a schematic to better visualize the setup. It also touches on the basic function of a 4-bit counter and questions about its operation when reaching its maximum binary number.
  • #1
AdkinsJr
150
0
Problem Statement .


I am trying to create a 12 bit counter with a combination of 4 bit counters (74191 Spec Sheet: http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/7831/NSC/74191.html)

I cannot figure this out for he life of me. I'm honestly not understanding many of the circuits we have to build in my course. It's one of those situations where I don't know, for instance, what a "flip flop" is, and then I look it up on the net or in my text, and after reading, I still don't know what a flip flop is.

I was able to assemble and test the counter (4 bits) but I do not know how to wire three to have a 12 bit counter.

Attempt at a Solution

I know that the RCO pin (13) should be connected to the enabler pin (4) of the next counter to signal it to start... In my diagram I have switches (S1, S2, etc...) connected to the pins 15, 1, 10, and 9 (the "inputs" )... the connection them are represented by the red wires...

I am not sure how to deal with the input pins (A,B,C,D @ pins 15, 1, 10, and 9) of the next counter...should I just connect them all to the output pins QA, QB, QC, QD?

I don't have a breadboard at the moment so I cannot test this, but I am trying to plan my circuit now and I'll assemble it in class.
 

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  • #2
AdkinsJr said:
Problem Statement .


I am trying to create a 12 bit counter with a combination of 4 bit counters (74191 Spec Sheet: http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/7831/NSC/74191.html)

I cannot figure this out for he life of me. I'm honestly not understanding many of the circuits we have to build in my course. It's one of those situations where I don't know, for instance, what a "flip flop" is, and then I look it up on the net or in my text, and after reading, I still don't know what a flip flop is.

I was able to assemble and test the counter (4 bits) but I do not know how to wire three to have a 12 bit counter.

Attempt at a Solution

I know that the RCO pin (13) should be connected to the enabler pin (4) of the next counter to signal it to start... In my diagram I have switches (S1, S2, etc...) connected to the pins 15, 1, 10, and 9 (the "inputs" )... the connection them are represented by the red wires...

I am not sure how to deal with the input pins (A,B,C,D @ pins 15, 1, 10, and 9) of the next counter...should I just connect them all to the output pins QA, QB, QC, QD?

I don't have a breadboard at the moment so I cannot test this, but I am trying to plan my circuit now and I'll assemble it in class.

It would be a lot easier to help if you could show us schematically what you are trying to do. Instead of linking to a datasheet, can you please upload a PDF of the part so we can see what all of its hooks and handles are?

And what do you think you would normally need to link one 4-bit counter to another to make an 8-bit counter? Are these counters synchronous or ripple? What is the difference?
 
  • #3
berkeman said:
It would be a lot easier to help if you could show us schematically what you are trying to do. Instead of linking to a datasheet, can you please upload a PDF of the part so we can see what all of its hooks and handles are?

And what do you think you would normally need to link one 4-bit counter to another to make an 8-bit counter? Are these counters synchronous or ripple? What is the difference?

They are synchronous counters. I attached a drawing of the setup, or the wiring I am attempting...I linked the sheet because it has the connection diagram, but here is the PDF attached...

EDIT: in my original post the breadboard layout you see shows the switches (S1, S2, ...) which are high or low (5 volts or 0 volts)...I have them connected with Red wires to the input pins of the counter, if you compare to the connection diagram in the data sheet (PDF) you'll see what I did. The black wires are shown connecting the counters to each other, from pin (13) on one counter connected to pin (4) on the adjacent counter...
 

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  • #4
You should get used to thinking through these ... it's usually a matter of going step-by-step: start by describing basically what the component does.

i.e. "The 4-bit counter basically outputs a binary number that is one more than the last one it outputted - the output is triggered by a pulse at an input" ... is that correct? (check)

Does it trigger on the leading or trailing edge of the pulse?
What does it do when it has reached 1111 and it gets another pulse?
 
  • #5




Hello, from your problem statement it seems like you are having difficulty understanding the concept of counters and how to wire them together. A counter is a digital circuit that counts the number of clock pulses it receives and outputs a binary number representing the count. A flip flop is a fundamental building block of a counter, it is a circuit that stores one bit of information and can change its output based on the inputs and clock signal.

To create a 12 bit counter using 4 bit counters, you will need to cascade them together. This means connecting the output of one counter to the input of the next counter. In your case, you will need to connect the output pins QA, QB, QC, QD of the first counter to the input pins A, B, C, D of the next counter respectively. This will create a 4 bit counter.

To create a 12 bit counter, you will need to repeat this process two more times with two additional 4 bit counters. The output of the third counter will be the 12 bit count. As you mentioned, the RCO pin (13) of each counter should be connected to the enabler pin (4) of the next counter to signal it to start counting.

In terms of testing your circuit, it is always best to have a breadboard to physically assemble and test your circuit. However, if you do not have one at the moment, you can use a simulation software such as Proteus or Multisim to test your circuit virtually. This will help you identify any errors or issues before you assemble it in class.

I hope this helps you understand how to wire a 12 bit counter using 4 bit counters. If you are still having difficulty, I would recommend seeking help from your instructor or a classmate who may have a better understanding of the concept. Good luck!
 

Related to Help with Counter Wiring Problem Statement

1. What is counter wiring?

Counter wiring is the process of connecting electrical wiring and components to a counter, typically in a kitchen or bathroom. It involves running wires through walls and connecting them to outlets and switches.

2. Why is counter wiring important?

Proper counter wiring is important for several reasons. It ensures the safe and efficient operation of electrical appliances and devices, minimizes the risk of electrical fires, and complies with building codes and regulations.

3. Can I do counter wiring myself?

It is not recommended for individuals without proper training and experience to do counter wiring themselves. It requires knowledge of electrical systems and safety precautions, and any mistakes could be dangerous. It is best to hire a licensed electrician for counter wiring projects.

4. How do I choose the right wires for counter wiring?

The type of wires used for counter wiring depends on the specific needs and requirements of the project. This includes the voltage and amperage of the electrical system, the distance the wires need to run, and the type of appliances and devices that will be connected. It is best to consult with a licensed electrician to determine the appropriate wires for your counter wiring project.

5. What are some common mistakes to avoid when doing counter wiring?

Some common mistakes to avoid when doing counter wiring include using the wrong type of wires, not following safety precautions, and not obtaining necessary permits and inspections. It is important to always consult with a licensed electrician and follow building codes and regulations to ensure a safe and successful counter wiring project.

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