Horizontal Tension Between Two Blocks?

In summary, the tension in the rope connecting two blocks being dragged by a horizontal force of 70N can be determined using the equation T=m1a + m1g*μ, where m1 is the mass of the first block, a is the acceleration of the blocks, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and μ is the coefficient of kinetic friction.
  • #1
cryptcougar
3
0

Homework Statement


Two blocks connected by a rope of negligible mass are being dragged by a horizontal force Fvec. Suppose Fvec = 70.0 N, m1 = 11.0 kg, m2 = 26.0 kg, and the coefficient of kinetic friction between each block and the surface is 0.100.

Determine the tension T.

Diagram: [ m1 ] ------Tension (T)----- [ m2 ] ------> Force

Homework Equations


F = ma

The Attempt at a Solution


Ok I'm assuming that the Net force pulling the two blocks = 70 N
I really don't know where to start in this problem I've tried finding the Forces of the friction
on the blocks and subtraced them from the net force but I'm just confused.
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF.

You got the F = ma part ok.

So what gets accelerated?

How much mass determines what the acceleration is right? Less of course the effects of friction.

So how much mass is getting accelerated by the 70N?

And if it is all accelerating together, then what must the net force be on the last mass being pulled with the tension?
 
  • #3
I figured it out!
Turns out you don't even need to really now the coefficient of friction.

All i did was find the acceleration of the blocks and use T=m1a
and found the tension
 
  • #4
cryptcougar said:
I figured it out!
Turns out you don't even need to really now the coefficient of friction.

All i did was find the acceleration of the blocks and use T=m1a
and found the tension

The Tension needs to not only accelerate the mass, but it also needs to overcome the friction.

Your tension then is m1*a + m1*g*μ
 

Related to Horizontal Tension Between Two Blocks?

1. What is horizontal tension between two blocks?

Horizontal tension between two blocks refers to the force that is exerted on the blocks in a horizontal direction when they are connected by a rope or cable. It is the force that prevents the blocks from moving away from each other.

2. How is horizontal tension calculated?

Horizontal tension is calculated by taking into account the mass of the blocks, the angle of the rope or cable, and the acceleration due to gravity. The formula for horizontal tension is T = m1m2g / (m1 + m2), where T is the tension, m1 and m2 are the masses of the blocks, and g is the acceleration due to gravity.

3. What factors affect horizontal tension between two blocks?

The factors that affect horizontal tension between two blocks include the mass of the blocks, the angle of the rope or cable, and the acceleration due to gravity. The tension will increase as the mass of the blocks increases and as the angle of the rope or cable becomes more horizontal. The tension will decrease as the acceleration due to gravity decreases.

4. How does horizontal tension impact the movement of the blocks?

Horizontal tension is responsible for keeping the blocks together and preventing them from moving away from each other. If the tension is too weak, the blocks may start to move apart. If the tension is too strong, it may cause the blocks to accelerate towards each other. The amount of tension needed will depend on the mass of the blocks and the angle of the rope or cable.

5. Can horizontal tension between two blocks be greater than the weight of the blocks?

Yes, horizontal tension can be greater than the weight of the blocks. This occurs when the angle of the rope or cable is less than 90 degrees. In this case, the tension is providing an additional force to support the weight of the blocks, making it possible for the blocks to stay together without slipping or falling apart.

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