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I IR camera 1550 nm IR light source

  1. Jun 14, 2018 #1
    I am looking for an IR camera that can pick up 1550 nm IR light source on the pix level. I have silicon wafers and I am going to hit the pixels with a 1550 NM IR light source and I want to be able to see the pix with a IR cam. I want to connect it computer and use a C# application to view the pixels.
    anyone knows a good cam I can use ?
    one that is not too expensive.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 14, 2018
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 14, 2018 #2

    berkeman

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    What's a pix level? What do you mean by "hit the pixels" with IR? Are you going to be taking the pictures through a microscope?

    What about this simple IR camera add-on for your cellphone?

    Cell Phone Versions: https://www.flir.com/browse/home--outdoor/mobile-accessories/

    Higher Resolution IR Cameras: https://www.flir.com/browse/home--outdoor/handheld-thermal-cameras/

    flirone-gen3-pro.png
     
  4. Jun 14, 2018 #3
    when I say pix level,
    I meant pixel level. so we can take a pic of a pixel.
    and yes using a len to act like a microscope.
     
  5. Jun 14, 2018 #4

    berkeman

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    Sorry, but that doesn't make sense to me. A picture is composed of pixels. You don't take a picture of a pixel. You want to take pictures of your wafers, right?
     
  6. Jun 14, 2018 #5
    The wafer it self has pixels. I have to zoom the IR cam in to one pixel on the wafer and take a picture of it.
    but really i need a cam that can do 1550 NM wavelength. I look at the cam you seen, and the data sheet does not give a that information
     
  7. Jun 14, 2018 #6

    boneh3ad

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    The spec sheet for the camera he suggested does give its spectral range (8 μm - 14 μm) but it is outside your range. It is a LWIR sensor. You need a SWIR sensor. That said, you still haven't really given much information. You need to know a lot more in order to pick out an IR camera. You can find them that run from 100 USD up to 200,000 USD and work all over the IR spectrum. You really need to narrow down your search criteria here.
     
  8. Jun 14, 2018 #7

    sophiecentaur

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    2017 Award

    You want to take a thermal image of a sensor array? Is that your interest in 1500nm? Do you plan to use a narrow band filter to isolate around 1500nm?
    All this stuff can be done but you want it cheap too. I think that could be the problem.
    I was wondering. If you are looking for the temperature of the various pixels on an array, there may be other ways. For instance, the noise level from each pixel would be different, according to its temperature.
    As I think it may not be feasible to do what you want, cheaply, perhaps you could give us a bit of context and the why's and wherefore's of your requirement.
     
  9. Jun 14, 2018 #8

    berkeman

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    Yeah, I'm pretty confused as well. Knowing more about the project would help.
    @btb4198 -- Another option if you only have to do this once or a small number of times would be to contract with a local test lab near you to use their test equipment for your photographs. We have all sorts of specialized labs here in Silicon Valley that we use for everything from Environmental Testing to Failure Analysis, etc. Contracting with them is usually cheaper than us buying the equipment ourselves.
     
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