Is a Photon the Quanta of Both Electromagnetic Field and Wave?

In summary, the vibrations of Faraday lines of force are said to create electromagnetic waves. These waves are made up of photons, which are the quanta of the electromagnetic field. However, there is some confusion about whether photons can also be considered the quanta of electromagnetic waves. Some argue that this is not a conflicting concept, as photons are only a representation of energy transfer in a changing field. This information was sourced from Carlo Rovelli's book, but it is recommended to read other sources as well for a more comprehensive understanding.
  • #1
gianeshwar
226
14
We say that vibrations of Faraday lines of force create electromagnetic waves.Now photon is the quanta of electromagnetic field.Is photon also the quanta of electromagnetic wave? How can the same photon represent both if so?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
gianeshwar said:
Now photon is the quanta of electromagnetic field.
It's only when a field is changing that energy is transferred and photons are an explanation of that energy transfer. I don't think there is any conflict of meaning here.
gianeshwar said:
We say that vibrations of Faraday lines of force create electromagnetic waves
What is the source of the information you are quoting here and in your other thread?
 
  • #3
Had read in Carlo Rovelli's book.
 
  • #4
Entertaining and not ‘wrong’, many popular science books are not to be used as textbooks.
If I were you, I would read a few alternative sources in addition to this book. A dry as dust textbook doesn’t go for dramatic effect like a good read but doesn’t tempt the reader to extrapolate.
 
Last edited:

Related to Is a Photon the Quanta of Both Electromagnetic Field and Wave?

1. What is the concept of quanta in fields and waves?

The concept of quanta in fields and waves is based on the theory of quantum mechanics, which explains the behavior of particles and waves at the atomic and subatomic level. In this theory, energy and matter are not continuous, but instead exist in discrete packets called quanta. This means that electromagnetic waves, such as light, also have a particle-like nature and can be described as a stream of quanta, called photons.

2. How are quanta related to fields and waves?

Quanta are related to fields and waves in that they are the fundamental units of energy and matter that make up these phenomena. A field is a region of space where a force or energy can be detected, and it is made up of many quanta. Waves, on the other hand, are disturbances that propagate through a medium or space, and they can be described as a collection of quanta moving together.

3. What are some examples of quanta in fields and waves?

Some examples of quanta in fields and waves include photons in light, phonons in sound waves, and gravitons in gravitational fields. Other examples include electrons in electric and magnetic fields, and gluons in the strong nuclear force. In all of these cases, the behavior of these particles and waves can be described using the principles of quantum mechanics.

4. How does the concept of quanta in fields and waves impact technology?

The concept of quanta in fields and waves has had a significant impact on technology. For example, understanding the particle-like nature of light and other electromagnetic waves has led to the development of technologies such as lasers, solar cells, and fiber optic communications. Additionally, the principles of quantum mechanics have also been applied to develop technologies such as transistors and computer processors.

5. What are some current research areas related to quanta in fields and waves?

There is ongoing research in many areas related to quanta in fields and waves, including quantum computing, quantum cryptography, and quantum field theory. Scientists are also exploring the potential applications of quanta in various fields, such as medicine, energy, and materials science. Additionally, there is ongoing research on the fundamental nature of quanta and their role in the behavior of fields and waves.

Similar threads

  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
28
Views
4K
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
27
Views
2K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
4
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
937
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
21
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
943
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
1
Views
933
Back
Top