• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products Here!

Is distance traveled proportional to relativistic momentum?

  • #1

Homework Statement


Hi I've been modelling a particle travelling in a particle detector that has a momentum vector Px, Py, Pz which we've conveniently been using Pperpendicular (i.e. in the xy plane) and Pz.

I can calculate the distance traveled in the xy plane and I need to calculate the distance traveled in the z direction.

Homework Equations


[/B]
Knowing that

[tex]\vec{p}=\frac{m\vec{v}}{\sqrt{1-\vec{v}^2/c^2}}[/tex]

The Attempt at a Solution



My guess was Momentum is proportional to the distance traveled which I can convince myself of in the case of classical momentum but knowing the momentum of this particle is of the order GeV/c I'm unsure whether I can actually do this? My assumption comes from being able to do this,

[tex]\vec{d}=\frac{m \Delta t}{\sqrt{1-\vec{v}^2/c^2}}\vec{v}[/tex]

where I assumed there was a proportionality constant k such that

[tex]p_\perp = k d_\perp[/tex]
[tex]p_z = k d_z[/tex]

Therefore

[tex]d_z=\frac{p_z}{p_\perp}d_\perp[/tex]

But I'm unsure if I can just throw in the gamma factor and the time interval into that constant k such that these equations are valid. Would this be correct or would I have to do it another way?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
34,049
9,901
The direction of motion is the direction of the momentum vector. Everything else follows from basic geometry.
 

Related Threads on Is distance traveled proportional to relativistic momentum?

  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
8
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
4K
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
1K
Top